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Lismore, Tweed to march for WA Aboriginal communities

On Thursday 19th March, the Lismore community and its surrounds marched as part of the first call to action in support for the global campaign, and again will take to the Lismore CBD in a peaceful protest on Friday May 1st from 4.30pm.

On Thursday 19 March, the Lismore community and its surrounds marched as part of the first call to action in support for the global campaign, and again will take to the Lismore CBD in a peaceful protest on Friday May 1 from 4.30pm.

Protests against the forced closure of Aboriginal communities in Western Australia will be held in Lismore and Tweed Heads on Friday.

The protest marches will be the second time supporters of both communities will take to the streets to vent their anger at state and federal government moves to withdraw services to 150 remote Aboriginal communities.

The Lismore and Tweed protest will be two of more than 70 protests being organised around Australia.

Lismore organiser Naomi Moran told Richmond Valley Radio that the governments were missing the point that ‘you can’t remove people from a land that is rightly theirs’.

‘This is about a human right,’ Ms Moran said.

‘This is about our countrymen in Western Australia who are being threatened with the loss of connection to country and the loss of Aboriginal culture that has existed for over 40,000 years on these lands.

‘We need our local community and leaders to stand with us in support and walk with us united in solidarity for the Aboriginal communities of Western Australia.’

The marches are part of a global call to action, with protests and marches also being organised in New Zealand, Los Angeles and across Europe.

Lismore protestors are asked to gather at the Browns Creek carpark from 4.30pm on Friday for a march around the central business district at 5pm.

Tweed marchers are asked to gather at the Tweed Heads Civic Centre at 4pm to march towards the Jack Evans Boat Harbour.


One response to “Lismore, Tweed to march for WA Aboriginal communities”

  1. Menkit says:

    My eyes have been opened by a book by Banjo Clarke, an iconic Aboriginal elder who showed lovingkindness and generosity to all he met in his life in spite of the horrific wrongs inflicted on him and his family his entire life. It’s truly time we stopped this madness. These people are still being treated by our government worse than animals. What happened to ‘Sorry Day’? Not very real was it.

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