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Byron Shire
May 24, 2022

Renewable energy in action

Latest News

Bringing learning and play together

Byron Bay High School’s new agility course recognises the importance of play for learning and has students from all years actively playing during breaks and PDHPE lessons, according to Byron Bay High’s Principal, Janine Marcus.

Other News

Coal fired. How are the major parties planning for its end?

There’s very little economic future for fossil fuels, even if you ignore the environmental effects. Renewable energy is cheaper, including battery storage.

Comment: Bridging the flooded divide

In the sodden floodplains the divide among those affected has never been clearer – those who were insured, and those who weren’t, renters and owners, Lismore LGA and everywhere else.

$17m in funds for work on crown lands in NSW

If you are involved in managing crown reserve land and facilities then now is the time to get that application in for a share of the $17 million that is available fro the 2022-3 funding round. 

Harm Labor

Much as I respect Richard Jones’ opinions on many things, I can’t agree with his conclusion last week (‘Election...

Temporary Protection Visas

As part of their pre-election strategy, Ballina Region for Refugees (BR4R) has been working to raise awareness of the...

SCU to house temporary accommodation for flood-affected residents

Temporary homes will be located at Southern Cross University (SCU) Lismore Campus as part of the NSW government's program to provide 800 temporary housing options for flood-affected people.

Need a dose of reality?

In 2011 Japanese with solar power sold 50 per cent more power to the grid than in 2010. They made $1.2 billion from their surplus electricity.

Nissan now has two energy-efficient cargo ships to transport its LEAF electric vehicles.

The ships have electronically controlled diesel engines and solar electricity that save thousands of tons of CO2 emissions yearly. Sails are next on the agenda for assisting cargo ships.

In the US wave and tidal power can realistically produce 15 per cent of energy needs by 2030 according to the Dept of Energy.

Last year was the ninth warmest since 1880. The highest annual average global surface temperature so far occurred in 2010. Around the world many food crops are affected by rising temperatures. Wheat will be particularly vulnerable according to a Stanford University scientist. He observed on satellite images that when the heat ramps up the wheat turns brown and stops growing.

You can watch a NASA video of how global surface temperature has changed since 1880 here: www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/2011-temps.html.

Sapoty Brook, Mullumbimby


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Race action at the TVSC Mother’s Day meet

A dedicated fleet of 13 boats took to the water for the Tweed Valley Sailing Club’s (TVSC) Winter series on Mother’s Day earlier this month.

Entertainment in the Byron Shire for the week beginning 25 May, 2022

The Jezabels The Jezabels are on a national tour to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of their multi-award winning Gold Album Prisoner. For the first time, the band will be playing their...

Comment: Bridging the flooded divide

In the sodden floodplains the divide among those affected has never been clearer – those who were insured, and those who weren’t, renters and owners, Lismore LGA and everywhere else.

Grants to support arts and culture flood recovery

Nearly 50 arts and cultural organisations, screen practitioners, individual artists and collaborative groups impacted by recent floods will have access to $500,000 in funding.