11.7 C
Byron Shire
May 18, 2021

Student power generates energy

Latest News

Butler Street Reserve checked for PFAS pollution

Authorities are checking the Byron Bay site for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, more commonly known as PFAS.

Other News

Resilient communities training on offer

‘Resilience’ has become a buzzword in Australia over the past few years, as communities across the country struggle to cope with fire, floods, and a pandemic.

Cartoon of the week – 12 May, 2021

Letters to the editor We love to receive letters, but not every letter will be published; the publication of letters...

A hands up poll

Helena Norberg-Hodge and John Page, Byron Bay Hands up everyone who wants another high-end tourist resort in Byron: a place...

All fired up: former magistrate fumes at news of the world

How does one react to news of environmental vandalism, rampant domestic violence and mutilation of women without anger or distress?

How much do you know about koalas?

How well do you know your koala facts? Test your knowledge at the June 2 Koala Hard Quiz in Mullumbimby.

Travelling at the speed of lies

When Tim Berners-Lee and others created the architectural foundations of the world wide web, they did so with the vision of openness, idea sharing, and trust. Human nature has a way of making things more complicated, of course.

Byron Bay High School will soon be generating its own electricity thanks to a $33,000 grant from the federal government for 42 solar panels for the school.

Ruby Kammoora and Lealah Shostak-Herber, pictured, are part of The Green Team environmental group, a voluntary extra-curricular lunchtime collective of nine enthusiastic student members ranging from years 9 to 12 who say they are determined to combat climate change.

Ruby and Lealah recently attended Australian Youth Climate Coalition’s Power Shift conference in Brisbane where they were inspired to lobby for re-powering their school.

‘It’s us, the youth of [the region], showing councils and governments that renewable energy is important to us.’

The Green Team plan is to convert their Performing Arts Centre to carbon neutral by installing the solar panels for energy and creating a water catchment.

‘This will be a totally self-sufficient building with an educational purpose – we’ll have an interactive graph showing the generation of energy versus consumption,’ says team leader Lealah. She is thrilled by the grant, which ‘signifies a strong basis for creating a greener school’. It will also save money from electricity consumption which can be redirected to educational projects.’

The team’s other activities so far have ranged from sponsoring five orang-utans in Indonesia to throwing week-long environmental awareness campaigns within the school community.

Image: More power to you… Ruby Kammoora and Lealah Shostak-Herber whose enthusiasm has garnered a grant for 42 solar panels at Byron Bay High. Photo Jeff ‘High Voltage’ Dawson

Previous articleRoof-fall man dies
Next articleRole of iodine

Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Quarry comes up against the farmers of Bentley

You would need to be a pretty tough customer to come up against the Bentley farmers, yet, that is exactly what Rob and Sarah McKenzie, the operators of the Bentley Quarry, what they say is a local, family-operated business, are doing.

All fired up: former magistrate fumes at news of the world

How does one react to news of environmental vandalism, rampant domestic violence and mutilation of women without anger or distress?

Business calls for Tweed train tracks to be kept ignored

More than 800 people had signed a petition calling for a new rail trail to be built next to, rather than in place of, the existing disused railway line running through the shire.

Resilient communities training on offer

‘Resilience’ has become a buzzword in Australia over the past few years, as communities across the country struggle to cope with fire, floods, and a pandemic.