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Byron Shire
May 26, 2022

Separating culture and nature

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Frida’s Field: nose-to-tail lunch

On Saturday 4 June, Frida’s Field will pay homage to their holistically-reared Angus-Wagyu cattle by hosting a special five-course...

Other News

Climate-related disasters influenced the election, Climate Council says

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Why I’m voting Greens 1 on Saturday

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Entertainment in the Byron Shire for the week beginning 25 May, 2022

The Jezabels The Jezabels are on a national tour to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of their multi-award winning Gold Album Prisoner. For the first time, the...

Beehives lost during floods: DPI

Statistics around the loss of livestock in the Byron Shire have been released by the NSW Department of Primary...

Vale big Jez, Mullum troubadour

The Mullumbimby community lost one of the founding fathers of its counter culture last Thursday, when Graham Chambers, better known as Jerry De Munga, passed away at his home with the love and care of wife Chrissy, family and close friends.

Frida’s Field: nose-to-tail lunch

On Saturday 4 June, Frida’s Field will pay homage to their holistically-reared Angus-Wagyu cattle by hosting a special five-course...

With regard to Echonetdaily’s article (9/3/2012) concerning petroleum exploration licences granted to the NSW Aboriginal Land Council, which includes 70 square kilometres of land 6km SE of Murwillumbah:  this is a classic example of political instrumentalism.

Indigenous peoples of Australia have been coerced, albeit over 200+years, to adopt the values of the colonising culture disregarding their own system of values that are nature based.  This is a political tactic to increase power to the centre.

My understanding of Aboriginal culture is that it gives agency to nature.  Through the Dreaming stories culture and nature are united.

The dominant, colonising culture has a system though which keeps culture and nature separate and denies the agency of nature.  The idea is that humans are separate from and dominant over nature, rather than dependent on it.  This has allowed nature to be commodified (used to gain monetary wealth).

Indigenous peoples of Australia had immeasurable wealth of another sort that afforded them survival on this land for in excess of forty thousand years.  Aboriginal people do deserve more.  But I would argue more status and respect for governance under their LORE, is what we all need!

Roxanne Finn, Tyalgum

 

 


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