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Byron Shire
March 3, 2021

Manx is one very cool cat

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Harry Manx, Currumbin Soundlounge, Friday Start Court Theatre, Saturday

 

Harry Manx has been dubbed an ‘essential link’ between the music of East and West, creating musical short stories that wed the tradition of the blues with the depth of classical Indian ragas. His unique sound is bewitching and deliciously addictive to listen to.

Born on the Isle of Man, Manx spent his childhood in Canada and left in his teens to live in Europe, Japan, India and Brazil. He honed his hypnotic live show on street corners, in cafes, bars, and at festivals. But it was Indian music that captured his attention and in the mid-80s he began a five-year tutelage with Rajasthani Indian musician Vishwa Mohan Bhatt (Grammy winner with Ry Cooder for A Meeting by the River). Receiving the gift of Bhatt’s custom-made, self-designed Mohan veena (a 20-stringed sitar/guitar hybrid) was the catalyst for Harry to forge a new path with his now-signature East-meets-West style of music. While the Mohan veena itself is beyond exotic, Manx uses it within traditional western sound structures.

A successful touring performer, Manx has brought his ‘breathtaking’ solo shows across Canada and into the USA, Australia, and Europe. He has appeared at many prestigious festivals, world-class theatres, concert halls and infamous blues clubs around the globe. Playing the Mohan veena, lap steel, harmonica, stomp box, and banjo, Manx quickly envelops the audience into what has been dubbed ‘the Harry Zone’ with his warm vocals and the hauntingly beautiful melodies of his original songs.

It’s in the live setting, Manx says, that the bridge between ‘heavenly’ India and ‘earthy’ American blues is most effectively built. ‘Indian music moves inward,’ he explains. ‘It’s traditionally used in religious ceremonies and meditation, because it puts you into this whole other place. But western music has the ability to move out, into celebration and dance. So when we play the Indian stuff on stage, it has the tendency to draw people into something really deep; they’ll get kind of quiet and spacey. Then we’ll play some more western music, and it grounds them once more; they come out of the mood the Indian music had put them in and get into the performance. I love to see that working – that effect on the audience. My goal has always been to draw the audience as deeply as possible into the music.’

Manx is a prolific artist, releasing nine albums in an eight-year span with no signs of stopping. He has received seven Maple Blues awards and his mantelshelf also holds honours from the Canadian Folk Music awards, Vancouver magazine Georgia Straight, and the South Australia Blues Society. He received CBC Radio’s Great Canadian Blues awards for 2007 and his albums have garnered five Juno nominations.

Blend Indian folk melodies with slide-guitar blues, add a sprinkle of gospel and some compelling grooves and you’ll get Manx’s unique ‘mysticssippi’ flavour. It’s hard to resist, easy to digest and keeps audiences coming back for more.

 

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbjk7DK5yb4

 

See Harry this Friday at the Currumbin Soundlounge or Saturday at the Star Court Theatre, Lismore.


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