15.2 C
Byron Shire
September 16, 2021

Tweed’s ‘$300m shortfall’

Latest News

State gov’t services failing to keep up with regional population growth, says independent Ballina councillor

Cr Cadwallader told The Echo on Thursday she’d be asking council staff to pursue the matter of policing resources in the shire after last month winning majority council support to pressure the government on the future of Lennox Head Public School.

Other News

Thank you Mayor Lyon

Thank you, Mayor Lyon for highlighting the risks in having visiting film crew, real estate speculators and the like...

More than 8,000 free meals given away in Ballina lockdown

Around 8,000 free meals were given to a dramatically increased number of people needing them in Ballina over the lockdown period starting 9 August.

Banned bunnies

Did you know that pet bunnies are banned in Queensland? But not in New South Wales! We’ve all seen the...

What’s with the bollards?

I completely agree with Clive Jeffery when he points out that the new pedestrian crossing near the Commonwealth Bank...

State gov’t services failing to keep up with regional population growth, says independent Ballina councillor

Cr Cadwallader told The Echo on Thursday she’d be asking council staff to pursue the matter of policing resources in the shire after last month winning majority council support to pressure the government on the future of Lennox Head Public School.

Transparency

Byron Shire Council (BSC) is not transparent despite what the former Mayor or BSC’s senior management would like the...

Tweed Shire Councillor Katie Milne

Tweed Shire Council is facing a $300 million shortfall in its future road network.  The ‘system is breaking down as the cost of arterial roads substantially exceeds the contributions that are, and will be, collected,’ according to council’s recent submission to the NSW review of the planning system.

I have called for a report on the cost of the Cobaki Lakes road infrastructure and was horrified to find the developer was only paying $49 million of the $93 million worth of the roads required for his development.

Roads come in twos or fours, but a developer only pays for what he uses.  For example if a developer needs the equivalent of 2½ lanes for his residents then a 4 lane road would be needed and Tweed Shire residents pick up the rest of the bill for the other 1½ lanes for his development.

Despite my three failed attempts to get any of the current councillors to investigate these developer shortfalls, I hope a new council will be more interested in one of the most important issues for council’s future financial viability and rate rises.

Previous articleDevelopers have licence to kill
Next articleNo Vision

Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Update: Lismore going into lockdown at 6pm

Lismore local government area (LGA) is going into lockdown for seven days from 6pm tonight following a positive case of COVID-19 in Goonellabah yesterday.

Is all cannabis the same? How do its variations impact us?

Are you interested in learning more about the cannabinoids you use? Researchers from Monash University are asking both smokers and non-smokers to help research the variety of cannabinoids and their impacts.

COVID venues of concern at Evans Head and Lismore

Three new venues of concern have been added to the list of COVID-19 venues of concern following a student at Goonellabah Public School testing...

Our 5 favourite Ig Nobel Prize Winners

Upside-down rhinos, nose-clearing sex and chewing gum forensics.