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February 28, 2021

Pet kill rates too high: RSPCA

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The RSPCA says the number of companion animals killed each year in Australia is appalling. It is in part responding to criticism by PetRescue on an SBS Insight program last Tuesday.

‘While the RSPCA does not classify itself as a no kill organisation, the not-for-profit animal welfare charity proactively, willingly and responsibly does its part to help ensure the number of unwanted companion  animals being euthanised every year is reduced,’ the group stated in a media release.

‘The RSPCA’s annual euthanasia statistics may appear high, but at closer glance the figures are quite telling. Of the 4,862 dogs euthanised by RSPCA NSW last financial year, 62 per cent were put down due to behavioural reasons; nearly 35 per cent were humanely euthanised due to disease and other medical conditions.’

RSPCA NSW CEO Steve Coleman said ‘Because of our open door policy, we take in animals that are sick, injured, abused, neglected and unwanted. A large majority of these animals are deemed dangerous or downright cruel to be kept alive.

‘We don’t take euthanasia lightly, and we don’t kill healthy animals unnecessarily. Regardless, the RSPCA reluctantly accepts that — in certain circumstances — euthanasia is necessary.

‘It would be unethical and socially irresponsible to rehome many of the animals that come through our doors.’

The RSPCA also runs dog training and rehabilitation programs, works with rescue groups, and promotes subsidised desexing and microchipping drives.

See the SBS program at http://www.sbs.com.au/insight/episode/watchonline/501/The-Tail-End


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