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Byron Shire
July 7, 2022

Time to Reel in the Big Fish

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Value of the intangible and Suffolk Parks future

It’s hard to know what value to place on the environment – until it changes irrevocably.  A place is defined...

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Happy New Year!

We all know we can help the planet by reducing our single-use footprint, so why not make a new...

Koori Mail wins NAIDOC Week award

Local media outlet and responder to the February and March floods, the Koori Mail was honoured at the annual National NAIDOC Week Awards held on Narrm Country on Saturday evening.

Bike path? 

Byron Councillors please note: A painted line on the side of the road is NOT a (safe) bike path. Paul...

Dry July to help you and Our House

In July 2008, three mates, Brett, Kenny and Phil, wanted to take a break from alcohol, so decided to abstain for the month of July, coining it their 'Dry July'.

Management of Byron’s fragile coastline impeded by NSW government: report

Insufficient funding and guidance from the State government is inhibiting Byron Council’s attempt to effectively manage its famous but fragile coastline, a Council report has revealed.

Active Fest and Olympics heading to Byron

Want a fun day of netball, rugby league, soccer, skateboarding, BMX, baseball 5, or tennis? The Active Fest is coming to the Cavanbah Centre in Byron on July 14.

Reel Big Fish was one of the legions of southern California ska-punk bands to edge into the mainstream following the mid-90s success of No Doubt and Sublime. Like most of their peers, the band was distinguished by their hyperkinetic stage shows, juvenile humour, ironic covers of new wave pop songs, and metallic shards of ska. The group cultivated an underground following that broke into the mainstream in summer 1997, when their single Sell Out became a modern rock radio and MTV favourite. Their appearance in the movie Basketball as the halftime band also gained them more fans and helped the band’s popularity to grow. Still fronted by original lead singer and songwriter Aaron Barrett, they continue releasing albums and touring relentlessly, playing more and more countries and bigger venues all over the world.

On 31 July 2012 Reel Big Fish released their seventh studio album, Candy Coated Fury (Rock Ridge Music), an inspired and infectiously catchy return to the hyperkinetic ska and biting wit of the band’s beloved early albums. Candy Coated Fury is Reel Big Fish’s first album of newly recorded original material in five years. Overall, it’s the seventh in the band’s twenty-year history, and it feels as vital and vitriolic as RBF’s foundational releases.

Reel Big Fish continues to tour non-stop, playing over 250 shows a year to thousands of loyal fans all over the world, gaining more and more underground popularity as the Ska scene continues to flourish.

You can see them this Friday at the Coolangatta Hotel.

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