14.9 C
Byron Shire
July 6, 2022

Don’t call me darling, mate

Latest News

Weaving through NAIDOC

DJ and Delta with some of the Weaving for Reconciliation exhibits. Photo Jeff Dawson.

Other News

First Nations Voice in Council moves closer

Byron Council will aim to give local First Nations people a role in its decision-making process by September 2024, echoing the newly-elected federal government’s pledge to honour the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

Australia to light the way with industrial-scale power

Big ideas are easy. Finding the big money and big names to back them is not. But a long-term plan to turn WA’s Pilbara into the largest renewable energy hub in the world has just taken a giant leap forward.

Lake Ainsworth

The heavy rain on 28–30 March 2022 resulted in flooding of Lake Ainsworth at Lennox Head to about 2m...

Will Byron become the Malibu of the antipodes?

Here’s another reason for millennials to be marching on the street. We found out last week that on census day 2021, 15 per cent of the dwellings in the Byron Shire were unoccupied (2,348 places to be precise). That figure was 30 per cent in Byron Bay itself, three times the national average. 

Commonwealth needs to step in to save endangered wildlife

According to the North East Forest Alliance (NEFA) the Commonwealth must intervene to save greater glider, the koala and the yellow-bellied glider from extinction.

Attempt to manage Byron’s fragile coastline impeded by State Government, report finds

Insufficient funding and guidance from the State Government is inhibiting Byron Council's attempt to effectively manage its famous but fragile coastline, a Council report has revealed.

Chris Dobney

Amid fighting with nurses over the implementation of ‘telehealth’ technology, dealing with shortages of doctors and wrangling ongoing funding issues, you’d think that Northern NSW Local Health District bureaucrats would have enough on their plates.

But sometime this month one has found the time to pen a memo instructing staff not to address their colleagues or clients as darling, honey, sweetheart – or even mate.

ABC radio reported that the memo told employees the terms of endearment could be seen as ‘disrespectful, disempowering and non-professional’.

The memo went on to say the directives were ‘in line with the NSW ministry code of conduct.’

God forbid the healthcare system should have a human touch. No wonder they’re so keen on replacing people with machines.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Management of Byron’s fragile coastline impeded by NSW government: report

Insufficient funding and guidance from the State government is inhibiting Byron Council’s attempt to effectively manage its famous but fragile coastline, a Council report has revealed.

Road workers strike first time in decades

Road workers, construction crews and other Transport for NSW workers will walk off the job for the first time in decades on Thursday, as frustrations over the NSW Government's effective pay cut boil over.

Extreme fire weather days in Australia have doubled

Extreme fire weather days in Australia have doubled, yet according to new research from an international team of scientists, including the CSIRO, extreme fire weather days have increased in Australia by 56 per cent over the last four decades.

Entertainment in the Byron Shire for the week beginning 6 July, 2022

Now showing at HOTA (Home of the Arts), Come From Away tells the remarkable true story of thousands of stranded passengers and the small town in Newfoundland, Canada, that welcomed them all.