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Friday’s 4 the locals

Chasing the great song

‘It started with a small obsession to write the perfect song, with everything I would want in it’, says Kato. ‘Of course as I grew older my opinion of a great song changed quite a bit. In the end, I found that the songs that were true to life had the most impact. Artists like Bob Dylan and a younger Neil Young began to shape my expectations and thoughts about songs. At the fragile age 18 you are bound to write about a few things. Love – lost, found and destroyed. This was to be my theme for my first release in 2009, whether I liked it or not…

WP-Garrett-Kato-_-TF-IMG_2286At the age of 23, Kato relocated himself to the beaches of Byron Bay. Here he began performing at local cafes and bars throughout the town alongside drummer Ben Livermore. A few months later the duo was spotted by platinum recording artist Pete Murray. Murray introduced Kato to engineer and producer Anthony Lycenko and they began work on his first Australian release Love. Murder. Songs.

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2012 was an exciting year for Kato, celebrating the release Love. Murder. Songs. EP, Kato toured the east coast of Australia and western Canada independently. Also scoring an opening slot for folk icon Jack Johnson at the Byron Bay international Film Festival.

Hipster Kids – recorded in Kato’s home studio – is a far cry from previous folk releases. A haunting yet grungy vocal appears reverberating through a thickness of bass and spacious beats.

With its dark and satirical lyric themes, Hipster Kids questions an overgrown suburban pop culture in mesmerising simplicity. This new single highlights Kato’s songwriting versatility and marks the evolution of his sound.

 

 


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