16.9 C
Byron Shire
May 17, 2021

CSG talks ‘should be balanced’

Latest News

All fired up: former magistrate fumes at news of the world

How does one react to news of environmental vandalism, rampant domestic violence and mutilation of women without anger or distress?

Other News

School Strike for Climate next Friday

Next Friday from 10am Byron Shire students will be demanding political action on the climate emergency in what they and their supporters say is our present, future and reality. 

Humans suck

Hannah Grace, Ocean Shores I heard on the local news late this afternoon (April 20) that a 370kg tuna ...

Water outage in Ballina this Thursday

Residents on Crane and Owen Streets in Ballina are advised of a planned water outage this Thursday May 13.

Cringe worthy PM

Keith Duncan, Pimlico After cringing at the spectacle of Scott Morrison blatantly lying to President Biden during that virtual climate...

Re Netflix

David Gilet, Byron Bay You would have to say that the Byron district has more than its fair share of wankers,...

Business calls for Tweed train tracks to be kept ignored

More than 800 people had signed a petition calling for a new rail trail to be built next to, rather than in place of, the existing disused railway line running through the shire.
Chris Dobney

It is up to schools to decide how to treat controversial subjects such as coal seam gas (CSG) mining, according to the state education department.

The comment from the state government followed revelations yesterday that CSG miner Metgasco had written to local schools offering them presentations by their senior staff and copies of a DVD on CSG mining.

Anti-CSG activist and Southern Cross University lecturer Aidan Ricketts said it was inappropriate and plain wrong for Metgasco to target schools as part of its vested-interest propaganda campaign.

While declining to comment on the specifics of the case, a department spokesperson told Echonetdaily, ‘the discussion of any particular controversial issue in a school, and which resources are used, are decisions made at the school level’.

‘The decisions would be based on factors referred to in the policy, including that the issue must be relevant to the students’ area of study, age-appropriate, and presented in a balanced way, including the fair presentation of the different sides of an argument,’ he said.

He added, however, that, ‘in terms of coal seam gas, this might include combining discussion of the science, economics and nature of the industry with discussion of geology, environmental issues, water quality, current and future traditional and renewable energy, government policy, and different land uses and their benefits and effects’.

The department has not commented on which of its schools has been approached by Metgasco.

Metgasco CEO was approached for comment but failed to return Echonetdaily’s calls by deadline.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Business calls for Tweed train tracks to be kept ignored

More than 800 people had signed a petition calling for a new rail trail to be built next to, rather than in place of, the existing disused railway line running through the shire.

Resilient communities training on offer

‘Resilience’ has become a buzzword in Australia over the past few years, as communities across the country struggle to cope with fire, floods, and a pandemic.

Independent councillor fact-checks housing supply in the Byron Shire

Independent Byron Shire Councillor Cate Coorey won approval from fellow councillors last week for a new reporting regime she says will offer clarification on dwellings approved in the shire.

How to exercise more voting rights in council elections

Being a property owner in NSW isn’t just a financial advantage, it also means you have more rights to vote than non-property owners.