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Byron Shire
May 13, 2021

North coasters keen on The Falls Festival

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Entertainment in the Byron Shire for the week beginning May 12

Check out what's on going the Byron Shire and surrounding area this week

Falls Festival young events management trainees (front) Jaden Moffitt, Reade O'lauchlan, Hamish McKenna, Jackson Bailey and Jara Larter with (rear) Byron shire mayor Simon Richardson and festival director Brandon Saul. The six young trainees are involved in the festival's youth training program to develop skills in construction, carpentry and event preparation after they were referred by the Byron Youth Service. The trainees have been busy working alongside the festival team at the site building the bamboo Guerrilla stage near the Arts Village. Photos Jeff Dawson.
Falls Festival young events management trainees (front) Jaden Moffitt, Reade O’lauchlan, Hamish McKenna, Jackson Bailey and Jara Larter with (rear) Byron shire mayor Simon Richardson and festival director Brandon Saul. The six young trainees are involved in the festival’s youth training program to develop skills in construction, carpentry and event preparation after they were referred by the Byron Youth Service. The trainees have been busy working alongside the festival team at the site building the bamboo Guerrilla stage near the Arts Village. Photos Jeff Dawson.

Around 3,000 Byron and Tweed shire residents will be among the 12,000-plus people expected to attend each day of The Falls Music and Arts Festival at the North Byron Parklands site, Yelgun, from New Year’s Eve to Thursday, January 2.

Preparations for the festival being held in NSW for the first time are going full steam ahead at the purpose-built event site at Yelgun which started its life six months ago as the home of the Splendour in the Grass festival, which also draws thousands of people to the area.

A special allocation of tickets for locals sold out this week, complementing a big bill of local performers which has thrilled organisers who say some local acts could end up being a highlight.

Big crowd pullers will be, from the US, The Roots, The Violent Femmes and Vampire Weekend and from Australasia, Neil Finn and Cat Empire.

Falls Festival director Brandon Saul the sellout of the local allocation tickets meant many from across the northern rivers were choosing to come for the whole festival and others ‘to spend their New Year’s Eve with us.

‘We’re really looking forward to putting on a great festival, Byron style. It’s also great to have so many locals performing at the festival. I suspect this section of the festival may end up being a bit of an unexpected highlight – it’s like a “festival within a festival”,’ he said.

An unholy trinity of local performers and artists set to entice, entertain and enlighten Falls Festival patrons with the wicked delights of the Shire. Wacko, Mae Wild and Joel Salom along with over 100 local performers will conjure a creative, and slightly warped, oasis in the Village area between the two main stages.
An unholy trinity of local performers and artists set to entice, entertain and enlighten Falls Festival patrons with the wicked delights of the Shire. Wacko, Mae Wild and Joel Salom along with over 100 local performers will conjure a creative, and slightly warped, oasis in the Village area between the two main stages.

A big part of The Falls Music and Arts Festival is a diverse program for The Village area of the festival.

Organisers say the line-up ‘presents a labyrinth of performance-based art that continues to grow bigger every year, physically and metaphysically’.

‘With artists and installations from across Australia and the world, The Village is a space packed with an organised kind of chaos, loveable characters, enchanting music and charming surrounds,’ they say.

‘Mixing local and national artists this year, the Byron Falls arts program is filled to the brim with performers of many varying genres, including gypsy folk bands, hip-hop beat producers, singer-songwriters, cabaret performers, glitchhop artists, scratch djs, burlesque danseuse, time travel artists, Bollywood dancers, theatre productions, yoga, creative workshops, giant puppet weddings and more.’

Another festival highlight is the Falls Fiesta, an ‘effervescent extravaganza on the last night of each event, which entails a colourful explosion of dancing and costumes with a huge parade designed to bring everyone together’.

Puppets and sculptures created throughout the art camps before and during the events lead the parade to party music.

You can follow the festival on various social media sites: fallsfestival.com  –  Twitter  –  Facebook  –  YouTube  –  Instagram

 

 

 

 


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5 COMMENTS

  1. Is it really “Byron style” to hold a festival with some 25,000 people at a site that dissects a wildlife corridor connecting some of the most biologically diverse environments in Australia? This wildlife corridor connects the hinterland World Heritage rainforests with the lowland coastal nature reserves.

    The “Byron style” that many of us know involves protecting and nurturing such environments. That’s something for which we are widely known. This new Byron style is something else seemingly cashing in on an existing reputation/ culture. This is not unlike the festival’s advertising material that has claimed that the festival is at “Byron Bay” when in fact it is not.

  2. Maybe the owners should go back to what was happening at the site before they bought it ie growing sugar sugar cane on the low section and intensive cattle production on the bushy and hilly sections of the site.So is it better to have environmentally unfriendly sugar cane growing with machinery,fertiliser ,loss of topsoil during rain,upsetting the acid sulphate soils and cattle grazing thru the bush eating and stamping the native bush or do you allow the new owners to plant thousands of trees,fence off the bush corridors and allow a few events each year.I think you need to look at the overall best outcome for this site instead of just a narrow point of view.Agriculture is by far a more destructive use of land than a well controlled public entertainment site.I am not pro or anti development , but I look at the historical use of land and do deep research before pushing ideas and thoughts on other people.

    • Geoff,

      Perhaps you would like to include us as a source for your “deep research” (CONOS Inc on FaceBook). Here’s a taste:

      A state government inquiry (the Clelland Inquiry) determined that agricultural use of the site would be minimised and conservation of the State recognised wildlife corridor (incl. much of the festival site) would be promoted through land use zones. Hence much of the agricultural land was zoned for conservation. All this after an inquiry that included Byron Council experts, independent experts and public submissions. To quote David Milledge (wildlife ecologist with 40 years experience):

      “The Marshalls Ridges corridor, situated in one of the most biodiverse regions
      of the continent, is recognised:

      · as a regionally significant corridor under NPWS’s 2003 KHC for
      NE NSW,where it was recognised as a major hinterland to coast link;

      · as a high priority climate change corridor in DECC’s 2007 Key
      Altitudinal, Latitudinal and Coastal Climate Change Corridors project
      undertaken for the NRCMA; and

      · more recently, as a key corridor in both the Border Ranges Biodiversity
      Management Plan and the Northern Rivers Biodiversity Management
      Plan, representing formal government mechanisms for recovering
      threatened species.

      It is essential for maintaining biodiversity in the adjacent Billinudgel Nature
      Reserve.

      The importance of the site as a crucial component of the corridor is
      recognised by Council’s environmental (7) zoning of most of the extant
      vegetation under the current LEP.

      The significance of the site for biodiversity conservation has never been
      challenged.”

  3. This is the last spoke of a wheel of life, with Wollumbin as its hub. This spoke maintains biodiversity from the hinterland to the coast, without it death of many species is insured. It is something to sing about and celebrate, but this not what is happening. Greed veils the soul (the hub of eternal life) just like Wollumbin is in this situation. To the original inhabitants of this sacred land this spoke was a songline, walked and sung for thousands of years. To these people greed was abhorrent as it was with all spiritually based cultures, even Christianity has the 7 deadly sins. These things are scoffed at by our materialistic culture of today, “Greed is good”, only to the fool. If a greedy man eats all of the fruit all suffer, the rest of the family go hungry and the greedy man gets a big bellyache.
    To the initiate (which the original people had amongst them) these 7 are the 7 sacred planets and the medicine of the metals to the alchemist, mastery of these brought liberation from all that possess one.
    The now owners of this land are by definition vampires feeding upon the sexual energy of the young, with no real regard for anything but their profit which in the longer term is their loss. They have shown nothing but contempt for the communities that exists within and around this land, be these communities flora and fauna or human residents. What is in the beginning shall be in the end, to many this is a Biblical statement – something else to be mocked, but in reality it is a profound philosophic key, for the motive behind actions will be present within the actions and be the end result of the actions. There is always a signature within the action, the occultist knows this as the law of correspondence which has its reading in what is termed the language of the birds. Modern psychology has touched this in body language but only touched it. In nature plants etc are given to the planets (7 sacred planets) as too are the affairs of man and his/her organs – by knowing these relationships both medicine and magic/alchemy can be effected. Wherever nettle grows dock will be close by, the juice of dock remedies the sting of the nettle. These profound harmonics are in operation in all creation, each herb has a signature of the planet that rules it, nettle is Mars — by this (its signature) the initiate will know the plants nature, Christ an initiate said “know them by their actions” — their actions are those of greedy manipulative people with only their self interest as their concern, no lasting good comes from such, suffering is its end result. What is it you celebrate and with whom?

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