18.6 C
Byron Shire
October 23, 2021

Internet history will not be stored: govt

Latest News

COVID-19 update: 5 new cases in the NNSWLHD

Northern NSW Local Health District, Acting Chief Executive, Lynne Weir, says there were five new cases of COVID-19 reported for the District to 8pm last night, 21 October.

Other News

French hypocrisy

The French are understandably upset about being stabbed in the back by Australia’s sinking of the submarine contract. They...

COVID-19 update: 5 new cases in the NNSWLHD

Northern NSW Local Health District, Acting Chief Executive, Lynne Weir, says there were five new cases of COVID-19 reported for the District to 8pm last night, 21 October.

Staff cuts at Murwillumbah mega school

The NSW Teacher's Federations says that the proposed merger of four schools in Murwillumbah will result in the loss of at least 19 teaching positions.

Blowhard alert

We have endured drought, bushfires, flooding and COVID. However, Australia must brace itself for something even worse. Something that...

NSW Legislative Council expresses concerns over push to burn native forests for power

The NSW Legislative Council unanimously passed a motion expressing its concerns over the growing push by industry to burn NSW native forests for electricity and hydrogen production.

Jeff Johnson calls for generational change at Ballina

The next in our series of interviews with Ballina Council hopefuls for the December election features Cr Jeff Johnson, who is also nominating for mayor after thirteen years service on council.

Internet history will not be stored, the federal government has said. (File pic)
Internet history will not be stored, the federal government has said. (File pic)

The federal government will not require internet companies to store people’s web browsing history as part of its new counter-terrorism plans, despite the prime minister suggesting it would.

Tony Abbott created confusion around the suite of measures on Wednesday when he tried to explain what types of customer metadata telecommunications companies would be required to keep for two years.

While it’s expected the information about Australians’ calls, texts and emails will be included, Mr Abbott suggested web browser history could also be captured.

‘It’s not what you’re doing on the internet, it’s the sites you’re visiting,’ he told the Nine Network on Wednesday morning.

‘It’s not the content, it’s just where you’ve been, so to speak.’

But the prime minister’s office later clarified his statement, saying browser history was not metadata and government agencies would still need a warrant to access such information.

Defending the data-retention plans, Mr Abbott described metadata as not being the ‘content of the letter but what’s on the envelope’.

In relation to mobile phones, metadata includes information such as origin and destination phone numbers, the billing name and address of both parties, time and duration of the correspondence, and the telecommunications tower used.

It does not include the content of the correspondence.

Online metadata covers the user-specific internet identifier code, IP addresses visited and the time, duration and number of visits.

It does not include the content of web browsing.

Mr Abbott said telecommunications companies already kept such information, and the government was simply asking them to continue to do so.

‘I have no doubt the civil libertarian brigade will do their best to stop this but my responsibility as prime minister is to keep our country safe,’ he said.

‘All of the expert advice from every single counter-terrorist agency is that this information is absolutely essential if we are to maintain our vigilance against terrorist activity’.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said Labor respected the fact that national security laws needed updating for the modern age.

‘But we also have concerns that when you store so much information about so many Australians that this needs to be done very carefully and in a considered way … so there is no risk that ordinary Australians are being treated as if they are criminals,’ he said.

Mr Shorten was also concerned that internet service providers might pass the cost of their data storage on to customers.

Attorney-General George Brandis said the electronic signature of websites could be recorded under the new laws, but clicks within a particular website would not.

‘When you visit a website, people browse from one thing to the next (within the same site),’ he told Sky News.

‘That browsing history won’t be retained and there won’t be any capacity to access that.’

However, the metadata being sought by agencies included the electronic addresses of visited websites, which computer accessed them, the time they were accessed and the durations, he said.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

NSW Education responds to Teachers Federation over Murwillumbah Education Campus staff cuts

The NSW Education Department has responded to the NSW Teachers Federation's accusation that Education Minister Sarah Mitchell has only just revealed the extent of staff cuts at the mega school.

The Rebels and the Wraiths visit Nationals: ‘We are facing a planetary crisis’

As part of a fortnight of climate actions and protests with the Extinction Rebellion, over 30 activists visited MP Kevin Hogan’s office in Lismore yesterday pushing ghostly empty white prams.

NSW Legislative Council expresses concerns over push to burn native forests for power

The NSW Legislative Council unanimously passed a motion expressing its concerns over the growing push by industry to burn NSW native forests for electricity and hydrogen production.

Diadem Street, Lismore

Around 2,000 residents in Lismore lost their electricity connection on Wednesday night after a large gum tree took out power lines.