8.2 C
Byron Shire
August 11, 2022

Lismore backs Tassie on right to protest

Latest News

Out of the Blue Adventures wins Tourism Hero Award

A local whale watching and eco-tourism business has been announced as one of the region's Local Tourism Heroes at a gala dinner co-hosted by Destination North Coast.

Other News

Israel Junkets

According to the Australian Strategic Policy Institute report federal parliamentarians received 139 sponsored trips of which 25 went to...

Tragedy of the commons

The tragedy of the commons refers to a situation in which individuals with access to a public resource (also...

AFL9s return to Byron after covid hiatus

Byron Bay’s Cavanbah Centre is set to host the two-day AFL9s Invitational tournament with $20,000 worth of prize money...

Potholes

Who’s with me in launching a class action against Byron and Lismore councils for compensation for us hapless ratepayers...

Festival goer dies with meningococcal disease

Late last night thousands of Splendour in the Grass ticket holders received an email alerting them that NSW Health has been notified of two cases of meningococcal disease in people who attended the festival.

Powerhouse six

Bearfoot is a powerhouse sextet that knows how to dig in and get a crowd bouncing, then brings them...

A section of the Lismore gathering against proposed Tasmanian laws threatening the right to protest. (Darren Coyne)
A section of the Lismore gathering against proposed Tasmanian laws threatening the right to protest. (Darren Coyne)

Darren Coyne

Australia is in the midst of ‘early onset fascism’, a Lismore rally against Tasmania anti-protest laws heard yesterday.

The proposed laws would create mandatory prison sentences for people who on two occasions gathered on public land to protest, if they slowed or hindered a vehicle registered to a business.

They are widely seen as squarely aimed at anti-logging activists but have been labelled discriminatory and out of balance.

Former Greens leader Bob Brown told a gathering in Hobart at the weekend that the laws would have jailed ‘Ghandi and Jesus Christ himself’.

On Tuesday, 100 people in Lismore gathered in solidarity to protests happening around the country in opposition to the Tasmania laws, which if implemented in NSW, would have led to fines of up to $2000 for Bentley anti-CSG protesters, and three month jail terms for second offences.

Aidan Ricketts, author of the Activist's Handbook, speaks at the Lismore rally.
Aidan Ricketts, author of the Activist’s Handbook, speaks at the Lismore rally.

Aiden Ricketts, author of the Activist’s Handbook, told the Lismore gathering ‘we are certainly living in the times of early onset fascism’.

‘Restrictions on trade unions against secondary boycotts are examples of that onset fascism,’ he said.

‘Recently In Victoria the protest laws so police can move people arbitrarily away from protests, in Queensland there are the VLAD (Vicious Lawless Association Disestablishment) laws, and all sort of unspeakable horror in terms of peoples’ rights.’

Lismore coordinator Emma Capp, who has just returned to the northern rivers after seven years in Tasmania, said ‘laws like this would dramatically affect the numbers of people wanting to stand up against CSG or to protect the Great Barrier Reef’.

Coordinator of the actions around Australia, Miranda Gibson, described the laws as a ‘direct attack on democracy’.

Ms Gibson, who spent 451 days in a tree trying to protect rainforest in southern Tasmania from logging last year, said the laws would be a dangerous precedent.

‘This is one of the most draconian pieces of legislation seen in Australia, and if passed in Tasmanian could set a terrible precedent for other states and territories. ‘ Ms Gibson said.

Activist Emma Capp and son Jetta at the Lismore rally yesterday. Emma has spent seven years in Tasmania, and has witnessed first hand the crack-down on protests. (Darren Coyne)
Activist Emma Capp and son Jetta at the Lismore rally yesterday. Emma has spent seven years in Tasmania, and has witnessed first hand the crack-down on protests. (Darren Coyne)

‘These laws are a direct attack on democracy. They are aimed at silencing the community, while allowing companies to be shielded from criticism or scrutiny from the public.’

Tasmania’s resources minister Paul Harris told ABC however that ‘the legislation currently before the Parliament does in no way diminish or take away from the opportunity for anyone to peacefully and legally protest,’ he said.

The bill has passed the Lower House and will now be considered by the independent-dominated Upper House.

The Tasmanian government has said the laws were designed to protect business owners and not to prevent people from protesting.

Meanwhile, Lismore activists will gather again this Saturday at the Italo Club at 5pm for the Rage Against Abbott concert.

Zoe King of Norfolk Island, a student at Lismore's Southern Cross University, was collecting letters to send to NSW Premier Mike Baird, outlining the region's opposition to coal seam gas mining. Under proposed Tasmanian laws, activists warn she could have been fined. (Darren Coyne)
Zoe King of Norfolk Island, a student at Lismore’s Southern Cross University, was collecting letters to send to NSW Premier Mike Baird, outlining the region’s opposition to coal seam gas mining. Under proposed Tasmanian laws, activists warn she could have been fined. (Darren Coyne)

 

 

 

 

 

 


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

2 COMMENTS

  1. There is a sign in the photo “You cannot silence the people”. That is a stupid sign. The people have been silenced. Just to make a noise by a crowd of people still means they are silenced.
    What the people need is action in legislation, in energy, in spirit and in physical and in emotional and mental terms.
    Then and only then are the words true. It never happens. How many times in the past seven years have we heard that the Labor Party is going to change?
    The words ‘You cannot silence the people’ is false. They are silenced. Like a mouse.

  2. If this new law is passed it is a disgrace that ordinary people cannot stand up and protest for what they believe in no matter how many times they have to without being fined, what is happening to peoples rights.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Tweed Council refuse aged care facility Tweed Heads

The proposed aged care facility at Caloola Drive Tweed Heads (DA20/0712) was refused at the Tweed Shire Council meeting last Thursday.

Evans Head, Iron Gates DA public planning meeting coming

The current development application (DA) for the flood and bushfire-prone site of the Evans Head, Iron Gates development will go before the Northern Rivers Planning Panel (NRPP) on 30 August.

Council acknowledges desire for house relocations, buybacks and land swaps

Last night Lismore Council looked at House Relocations, Land swaps and Buy Backs when Councillor Adam Guise’s moved a motion that “Council acknowledges flood impacted ratepayers' desire for house relocations, buybacks and land swaps."

Bruns underground car park reconsidered 

Byron Council’s decision to approve a controversial mixed-use development in Brunswick Heads that would include the town’s first underground car park could be overturned at this week’s meeting, with a group of councillors moving a rescission motion.