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Whistle signals Tweed museum re-opening

The Historic Powerhouse Whistle, one of the first items to be installed this week at the redeveloped Tweed Regional Museum in Murwillumbah, is admired by museum collection and program support officer, Kirsty Andrew. The museum's grand opening is at the end of this month. Photo supplied

The Historic Powerhouse Whistle, one of the first items to be installed this week at the redeveloped Tweed Regional Museum in Murwillumbah, is admired by museum collection and program support officer, Kirsty Andrew. The museum’s grand opening is at the end of this month. Photo supplied

The redeveloped Tweed Regional Museum in Murwillumbah this week was a hive of activity as collections began the journey back to their permanent home for its re-opening to the public on Sunday 31 August.

A collection of artefacts associated with cedar-getting and early settlement in the Tweed Valley, the Historic Powerhouse Whistle and old favourite ‘Banana Jim’, are the first items to be installed as part of the new displays.

‘The extensive redevelopment process is now almost complete,’ said museum director Judy Kean.

‘The last two and a half years have involved almost every single aspect of museum work, and then some,’ Ms Kean said.

‘We have documented and packed up the collection, built and fitted out a new collection store, unpacked and built a new museum, restored a wonderful heritage building and developed new displays. It has been an extraordinary journey,’ she said.

The collection going back on display has been carefully prepared by museum staff and volunteers and has involved many hours of research and specialist preparation.

‘The delivery of a very large truck full of custom-designed showcases earlier this month and their installation by a specialist crew, was the last piece of infrastructure to slot into place. Over the next three weeks museum staff will finish installing the new displays.’

Tweed Shire Council’s manager community and cultural services, Robyn Grigg, acknowledged the contribution that volunteers will continue to make to the museum post opening.

‘More than 60 new front-of-house volunteers have been through an intensive recruitment and induction process. Their role in welcoming museum visitors is invaluable,’ Ms Grigg said.

‘We are also looking forward to having the Murwillumbah Historical Society back at the museum undertaking their all-important research role and assisting with museum programs.

‘Members of the society have been very patient during the redevelopment process and we thank them for this,’ she said.

The opening of the museum will coincide with the Tweed Valley Banana Festival, and the building will be officially opened by NSW arts minister Troy Grant and Tweed mayor Barry Longland just prior to the festival parade.

The museum will open seven days a week for a limited period (31 August-30 November) to establish when people prefer to visit. Opening hours during this period will be Monday-Friday 10am-4pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-3pm. For further information visit museum.tweed.nsw.gov.au


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