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Byron Shire
April 15, 2021

Far From The Madding Crowd

Latest News

SCU celebrates alumni achievements with awards

A group of Southern Cross University graduates who have made extraordinary global achievements in research, community building, healthcare and environmental issues have been acknowledged with the 2020 Alumni Impact Awards.

Other News

Francis Cloake in running for National Portrait Prize

Byron Bay's Francis Cloake is one of two Northern Rivers photographers named as a finalist in the prestigious Living Memory: National Photographic Portrait Prize.

Lilac house bound by red tape

Mullumbimby resident Nicole Haberecht is facing a $3,000 fine and the prospect of repainting her house after Council made a demand that she change the colour after it was painted a shade of lilac.

HuskeeSwap launches in Lennox

An exciting initiative to keep coffee cups out of landfill launched in Lennox Head yesterday. Ballina Shire Council is backing the HuskeeSwap program with free coffees at different cafes in Lennox this week, for coffeeholics keen to try a new solution to a growing problem.

Rotary Downunder Baton handed over at Byron Bay

The Rotary Club of Byron Bay recently took the Rotary Downunder Baton to the most easterly point of Australia as part of its national journey. As well as being the national celebration of one hundred years of service by Rotary in Australia, the theme for the centenary is 'Rotary says no to domestic violence'.

Poetic plea from Gaza

Gareth W R Smith, Palestine Liberation Centre – Byron Bay This heart cry from Gaza, written by Gazan poet and...

Is it solar fair?

Meg Pickup, Ballina The Australian Energy Market Commission (AEMC) draft rule change will result in solar households and businesses being...

Cinema review by John Campbell

If there is one thing that you can rely on in any story by Thomas Hardy, it is that whatever can go wrong will go wrong. More often than not it’s as a result of freakish coincidence or nature’s penchant for perverse malevolence. But life is like that anyway, isn’t it? This is a fantastic movie – and not least of all for the performance of Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene (the spelling is different, but the heroine of The Hunger Games shares the same surname).

My fear was that Mulligan might not emerge from the shadow of Julie Christie, the iconic actress who starred in John Schlesinger’s 1967 take on the novel, but she is stunning as the prototype feminist who is yet unable to fully liberate herself from the influences and demands of the men in her life.

Watching this in Paris (and trying to stop myself from compulsively reading the French subtitles), I was struck by the surprisingly large turnout – until it occurred to me that Thomas Vinterberg’s adaptation is deeply philosophical and ‘earthy’ in the way that appeals so much to the Gallic temperament, and also charged with a smouldering eroticism that has no call for crass R-rated sex. I would struggle, too, to remember the last time I saw a film with so many scenes of ‘page-turning’ impact. From the moment when the shepherd Gabriel Oak (Matthias Schoenaerts) so shockingly loses his flock, to when Bathsheba is joined in song by the pining wealthy landowner William Boldwood (Michael Sheen), to when the bounder Sergeant Troy (Tom Sturridge) indulges in drunken ribaldry on his wedding night, to when – perhaps the most heart-thumping episode of all – Bathsheba rides frantically back with Gabriel to save her dying sheep, Vintergerg’s sense of the emotionally tactile never misses its mark.

Astute as the casting of the male leads is, however, it is all about Bathsheba, and Mulligan, with an extraordinary ability to expose her inner world with the slightest facial expression, takes us as far as we can go in understanding the neverending conflict between fate and stubborn self-determination.

Hardy’s Wessex is gloriously shot by Charlotte Bruus Christensen, as well.


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Red Cross offers additional bushfire grants

Australian Red Cross is opening a final round of support grants for people affected by the bushfires who are suffering extreme financial hardship.

The return of the prodigal son

Gallery DownTown, the annexe of Tweed Regional Gallery, is presenting a new exhibition by regional artists.

Rotary Downunder Baton handed over at Byron Bay

The Rotary Club of Byron Bay recently took the Rotary Downunder Baton to the most easterly point of Australia as part of its national journey. As well as being the national celebration of one hundred years of service by Rotary in Australia, the theme for the centenary is 'Rotary says no to domestic violence'.

Interview with Jean Kittson

Comedian, writer, and social commentator Jean Kittson has the ability to distil complex ideas into commonsense. Jean is one of the national treasures in conversation with Mandy Nolan and Fiona O’Loughlin at No Eggs for Breakfast, a comedic chat themed around life beyond fertility! It seemed remiss not to ask Ms Kittson on her take on the debacle that is federal politics and gender equity.