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Byron Shire
April 11, 2021

See how our rescued seabirds are treated

Latest News

A win for the roughy

The battle for the 'roughy had been a tough road for conservationists and hopefully this win will be the last fight.

Other News

Shearwater almost perfect with 99kW solar

Shearwater, the Mullumbimby Steiner School, has made the switch to solar, installing a 99 kW system to power the school into the future.

$50,000 in grants for sixteen Tweed sports clubs

Tweed sporting organisations have received a welcome boost with the announcement of the Local Sport Grants Program by the NSW Government.

Cartoon of the week – 7 April, 2021

We love to receive letters, but not every letter will be published; the publication of letters is at the discretion of the online and print letters editors.

West Bank apartheid

Palestine Liberation Centre, Byron Bay The ABC’s Religion and Ethics Report this week featured an interview with former Israeli cabinet...

Brunswick Heads surf lifesaver wins gold 

Brunswick Heads surf lifesaver Paul ‘Punchy’ Davis won gold in the 600m paddle board race

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: The Mask of Freedom

Today in Mullumbimby I witnessed a woman blowing bubbles on people. She was walking with her dog and blowing bubbles over passers-by. What is usually the magical work of the fairy tribe, today it had a kind of aggression. The bubbles weren’t by accident. This was a ‘Fuck You’ to mask wearing. A fuck you to people wearing masks. A fuck you to the existence of this coronavirus.

Australian Seabird Rescue is a local not for profit marine wildlife rescue organisation that has been operating for over 20 years. We rescue pelicans, seabirds, shorebirds and sea turtles and other marine wildlife.

We are based in Ballina at the Wildlifelink Sanctuary, 264 North Creek Rd.

From Monday June 29 to Friday July 10 we run tours of our sanctuary at 10am on weekdays.

The tours involve us talking about all of the great work that we do. We show a video and then take the guests out to see our sea turtle nest display. Then we head out to the Sea Turtle Hospital and show guests how we treat the sea turtles and the reasons why they end up stranded on the beaches. We also offer suggestions on what you can do to make a difference to help protect the ocean and its wildlife.

The tour is enjoyable for all age groups and runs for one hour. The cost is $5 per person.

The money we raise from the tours helps us to look after the animals in care.

There is no need to book for the tours, just come along at 10am on weekdays.

Kath Southwell, GM, Australian Seabird Rescue Inc, Ballina


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Council crews working hard to repair potholes

Tweed Shire Council road maintenance crews are out across the Tweed's road network repairing potholes and other damage caused by the recent prolonged rainfall and previous flood events.

Poor Pauline

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New film celebrates getting back outside

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