19.7 C
Byron Shire
April 13, 2021

Ballina MP to sit on state government shark inquiry

Latest News

Getting the right stuff in your bins in the Tweed

Tweed Council is asking residents to be more careful with what waste they put in which bin – a surprising amount of the area's refuse, both recycling and landfill, ends up in the wrong receptacle.

Other News

Poor Pauline

Bob Vinnicombe, Sefton A lot of hypocrisy from Labor and The Greens about respect for women. Look at the treatment...

Poetic plea from Gaza

Gareth W R Smith, Palestine Liberation Centre – Byron Bay This heart cry from Gaza, written by Gazan poet and...

Dead rats in the Byron bubble?

Poppa Veet Mayo, Main Arm Am I the only one who can smell a dead rat in this bubble called...

Waking up with a sick feeling in my gut

Horst Tietze, Mullumbimby Thank you to Mandy Nolan for publishing her courageous account of growing up as a young woman...

My own pandemic imaginations

Robert Podhajsky, Ocean Shores Imagination is a powerful mechanism; I must admit I get unsettled with my own pandemic imaginations...

Getting the right stuff in your bins in the Tweed

Tweed Council is asking residents to be more careful with what waste they put in which bin – a surprising amount of the area's refuse, both recycling and landfill, ends up in the wrong receptacle.

Greens MP for Ballina, Tamara Smith will sit on the state government's shark inquiry.
Greens MP for Ballina, Tamara Smith will sit on the state government’s shark inquiry.

Ballina MP Tamara Smith will be a member of a just-announced parliamentary inquiry into the management of sharks in NSW waters.

Ms Smith is also Greens spokesperson on marine environment and Fisheries.

The inquiry was announced this morning as a reaction to a spate of recent shark attacks along the NSW coast, especially the north coast, and an unprecedented number of great white shark sightings in recent months.

It has been initiated by the parliament’s multi-party committee on investment, industry and regional development, of which Ms Smith is also a member.

Ms Smith said, ‘This will be an important inquiry to assess the current shark management programs in NSW and compare that with experiences in other jurisdictions.

‘I hope to come out of this inquiry with a strong, evidence-based list of recommendations to government about the best way to keep people safe and also ensure we preserve healthy and biodiverse oceans.

‘I look forward to receiving submissions from the local public, scientists, community groups, and businesses to ensure we can put forward the best recommendations to government. I hope we can also have hearings on the north coast.

‘The current research program and upcoming shark summit will provide even more valuable information for the inquiry to consider,’ Ms Smith said.

Committee chair Kevin Anderson MP said the inquiry had been set up to examine if recent events ‘have impacted winter tourism and how the NSW Government can support [affected] communities.’

Mr Anderson said that inquiry will examine any changes in shark numbers or habitat.

‘This inquiry will investigate what is happening with shark populations in NSW waters, and what the government is doing to protect and educate beachgoers,’ Mr Anderson said.

‘The inquiry will complement the NSW Government’s investigation in to emerging shark deterrent technologies,’ Mr Anderson said.

The inquiry will be open for public submissions until October 23.

The Terms of Reference for the Inquiry include:

  • The impact of shark attacks on tourism and related industries;
  • Changes in shark numbers, behaviour or habitat;
  • Adequacy of management strategies; and
  • Measures to prevent attacks by sharks, including strategies adopted in other jurisdictions.

 


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Have people read the Terms of Reference especially Number 1 “The impact of shark attacks on tourism and related industries;”
    That means that changes have to be made on the NSW Coast that a person in Alice Springs or Oodnadatta can be enticed to come and swim in NSW north coast waters and not be afraid of sharks. When it says “tourism” that includes all of Australia’s population and overseas tourism.

  2. I’m not sure how much good a shark tagging program is going to be if the transmitter cannot give real time data to the listening stations dotted along the coast there. It means that if your a swimmer or surfer, the shark is going to eat you anyway and transmit is location some time later! It wouldn’t give me any degree of comfort as a potential swimmer in those waters.

  3. If you’re worried about surfers being expendable, don’t go out there. I swim, I scuba dive, and I paddle a ski. I take the risk. It’s part of life.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Disguised junk mail

A Sinclair, Mullumbimby Does anyone know who is responsible for the thinly disguised bundles of junk mail that are now arriving weekly somewhere in the...

Industry response to Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety

As the pandemic has again highlighted the standard of treatment of our elders, Australia’s aged care industry has urged the Federal Government to adopt...

Poetic plea from Gaza

Gareth W R Smith, Palestine Liberation Centre – Byron Bay This heart cry from Gaza, written by Gazan poet and writer Mohammed Rafik is remarkable...

Methane: the breakfast of champion trees

A research study lead by Southern Cross University scientists has discovered an unlikely microscopic ally in the battle to reduce the amount of methane gas in the atmosphere.