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Byron Shire
January 26, 2022

Community brekkie reopens panoramic Tweed Heads lookout

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1. A special place for all ages … (from left) Taneesha Buxton, Tweed Heads Historical Society President Joan Smith, Tiani Browning-King (holding Bohdi Browning-King), Work for the Dole team Leader Peter Dillon, Council's Manager Recreation Services, Stewart Brawley, Jackie McDonald, who spoke about Joongurrabah's significance for Aboriginal culture, Work for the Dole Coordinator Chris Muldoon, Council Acting General Manager Tracey Stinson, Tursa representative Lance Penfold, Grant and Lily Buxton and Tweed Regional Museum Director Judy Kean. 2. Frank and Christine Healy were thrilled when Tom Beatson Outlook reopened so they could resume their regular walks to the top of Razorback.
A special place for all ages (from left): Taneesha Buxton, Tweed Heads Historical Society president Joan Smith, Tiani Browning-King (holding Bohdi Browning-King), Work for the Dole team Leader Peter Dillon, council’s manager recreation services, Stewart Brawley, Jackie McDonald, who spoke about Joongurrabah’s significance for Aboriginal culture, Work for the Dole coordinator Chris Muldoon, council acting general manager Tracey Stinson, Tursa representative Lance Penfold, Grant and Lily Buxton and Tweed Regional Museum director Judy Kean. Photo supplied

A community breakfast last Friday celebrated the reopening of the popular Tweed Heads landmark known as Tom Beatson Outlook on the top of Razorback, which has undergone a $100,000 facelift.

The park, with its panoramic views of the Tweed and Gold Coast, was closed last April because of safety concerns about the walkway’s handrails.

Its refurbishment was completed in time to reopen the park for Christmas, and included construction of new safety railing and upgrade of the park’s shelters, tables and seating.

The re-opening celebration drew around 140 people from throughout the region, who trekked to the top of Razorback for the breakfast to celebrate the reopening.

Tweed Shire Council’s acting general manager, Tracey Stinson, said ‘the number of people who joined us for the breakfast, from many different walks of life, demonstrated how this site means so many things for so many people’.

‘Today’s celebration further highlighted how the location is also known by a few different names. Joongurrabah, its traditional Aboriginal name, has great importance for Aboriginal culture and education and it was very fitting that culture was central to this morning’s gathering,’ Ms Stinson said.

‘For many other people it is simply known as Razorback and, standing here today and looking out over the district, it is easy to see how Razorback has become synonymous with special events in people’s lives and a centrepiece of the Tweed’s heritage.’

Historical officers and volunteers, Tweed District Residents and Ratepayers Association, Tweed Chamber of Commerce and Industry leaders, and council representatives were joined by coordinators of the Work for the Dole program that helped give the location a facelift before its reopening.

‘It was wonderful to see some of Tom Beatson’s relatives at the celebration,’ Ms Stinson said.

Frank and Christine Healy were thrilled when Tom Beatson Outlook reopened so they could resume their regular walks to the top of Razorback.
Frank and Christine Healy were thrilled when Tom Beatson Outlook reopened so they could resume their regular walks to the top of Razorback.

‘Tom Beatson was a big, colourful personality, a bit of a larrikin and a great master of ceremonies, and I’m sure he would have loved to have seen such a big gathering for this occasion.’

Participants at the breakfast were treated to a telling of the traditional Aboriginal story about Razorback, by Tweed Aboriginal Advisory Committee member Jackie McDonald.

‘But Joongurrabah is not just about the story of how the birds got their colour,’ Ms McDonald said.

‘It’s also a very important place for the passing down of knowledge and Aboriginal culture from one generation to the next.

‘Joongurrabah is also a valuable part of community education, including a place where teachers and the police force have undergone cultural awareness training.

‘That helps teachers pass on cultural awareness to their pupils and embed Aboriginal perspectives into all aspects of the school curriculum,’ Ms McDonald said.

 


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2 COMMENTS

  1. The community is not there. The Community was not invited. I put my name and address down of a Tweed Council enquiry sheet that I was interested in any communication about Razorback Lookout. Still have not heard anything from Tweed Council.

  2. We visited Tom Beatson Lookout on the 19/9/1996 with my Brother and my Sister In Law from Canada and found the climb to the Top a wonderful Walk and the Views over the Tweed Heads are just sooooooooooooooo Great – we are so Glad that the Council has re-opened the Lookout – thank You for all those Memories !

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