21.1 C
Byron Shire
January 28, 2022

NORPA’s Bundjalung Brothers funded

Latest News

Two deaths in Northern Rivers in previous 24 hours, 29 across the state

There were another two deaths reported in the Northern NSW Local Health District (NNSWHD) to  8pm 26 January with 44 people in hospital and five in ICU.

Other News

Children: to vax or not to vax?

With the option to vaccinate 5–11-year-olds now available, The Echo took the time to talk to local Byron Shire Dr Joel Hissink about vaccinating children.

Lismore Council’s Advisory Groups need you

Lismore Mayor Steve Krieg said the Council is seeking passionate locals to participate in the Aboriginal Advisory Group, the Access and Inclusion Advisory Group and the Nimbin Advisory Group.

Check a charity’s status before donating to a good cause

It wouldn't be the first time generous people have been scammed by fake charities and in the wake of the Tonga disaster, Australia's charity regulator is urging a quick check before donating.

Kindness to animals recognised in Tweed Shire Australia Day awards

The care Amanda Philp has provided to numerous animals on land and from the sea has seen her recognised as Tweed Shire Citizen of the Year.

What does Australia Day mean?

Another Australia Day. Another divisive polemic about the date, the day, and its meaning. Those who seek to change the date argue that 26 January signifies the beginning of Britain’s invasion of Australia and the violent expropriation of Aboriginal lands.

Bill will not prevent social media trolling: Law Council

The nation’s peak law advocay legal body, The Law Council of Australia, is calling for a nationally consistent approach to law reform as ‘the best defence against social media defamation’.

Left to right: Mikael Smith - Ngulingah Local Aboriginal Land Council (project partners) Mick Ryan - Bundjalung Elders Council (project partner) Mitch King - NORPA Trainee Associate Producer Julian Louis - Artistic Director NORPA & co-director/devisor 'Three Brothers' Thomas George MP - Member for Lismore
Left to right: Mikael Smith – Ngulingah Local Aboriginal Land Council (project partners)
Mick Ryan – Bundjalung Elders Council (project partner)
Mitch King – NORPA Trainee Associate Producer
Julian Louis – Artistic Director NORPA & co-director/devisor ‘Three Brothers’
Thomas George MP – Member for Lismore

NORPA’s collaborative project Bundjalung Nghari – Three Brothers is the latest of the company’s locally created Generator productions to receive a Regional Partnerships grant from Arts NSW.

Three Brothers is a universal story of family legacy and cultural identity. Through a dynamic mix of traditional and contemporary language, dance, song, visuals and movement, renowned Aboriginal theatre and dance practitioners are collaborating to develop the work.

The creative team includes co-director/devisors Rhoda Roberts and Julian Louis (NORPA Artistic Director), David Page, Djon Mundine, Kirk Page and Tybian Wyles.

The poignancy of the story rests in the parallel of a fictional Aboriginal family to the ancestral ‘Three Brothers’ story of the Bundjalung people. This, the first creation story sited on the convergence of the three rivers, provides a powerful foundation for the construction of the new work.

Three Brothers glimpses into the lives of three contemporary characters and tackles notions around death, family, immortality, and the struggles of maintaining a father’s legacy. It is a story of healing old wounds, addressing truths and sharing deep secrets in a new century.

‘At the heart of Bundjalung-Nghari – Three Brothers is the process of collaboration and community engagement. This not only feeds into Three Brothers creatively but also develops important connections across the broader community, ‘ says NORPA Artistic Director Julian Louis’.

‘The northern rivers region has a strong Aboriginal community including nationally accomplished Bundjalung artists. The aim is to come together to tell a Bundjalung story with an Aboriginal voice, to devise a contemporary theatre work that speaks across generations and cultures, fusing the traditional with the contemporary, across dance, song and language.

Local Aboriginal associate artists will drive the community engagement program, delivering workshops in song, dance and craft, mentored by the creative and production team, and supported by the project partners.

‘The northern rivers region of NSW has a high Aboriginal population, nearly twice the state’s average,’ said Rhoda Roberts.

‘The Bundjalung language is one of very few traditional languages of the east coast that is still spoken. The Wi-abul / Widjabul people of the Bundjalung nation have held the stories of the Bundjalung people for thousands of years and there is a true desire, through Elders, youth, community leaders and artists to share these stories with the broader community.’

Aboriginal affairs minister Leslie Williams said the funding will help Aboriginal artists from NSW build on their skills and capabilities.

‘It is important that Aboriginal artists are able to raise awareness of their history and culture in innovative ways to connect local communities to local Aboriginal stories,’ Mrs Williams said.

Bundjalung Nghari–Three Brothers is a partnership between NORPA, Bundjalung Elders Council, Ngulingah Local Aboriginal Land Council, Northern Rivers Conservatorium, Playwriting Australia and Interrelate Family Centre, to create, produce and present an innovative, contemporary theatre work Three Brothers that will premiere at NORPA in Lismore in 2017.

In Bundjalung language ‘Nghari’ means ‘play’. NORPA’s ‘Bundjalung Nghari’ initiative generates projects to celebrate and share local indigenous culture. These projects are overseen by NORPA’s Aboriginal Advisory Committee and carried out in collaboration with local groups and organisations. Three Brothers is the first stage of this new initiative.

An excerpt will be performed later this month at APAM, the premiere Australian performing arts market where new works are showcased and pitched to international and national presenters.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Vaccinating koalas against chlamydia

Koala chlamydia affects 60 per cent of koalas that are admitted to the Currumbin Wildlife Hospital and is having a significant impact on koalas in the region. The figures have continued to rise each year.

Lismore Citizen of the Year 

Recognising her tireless work in helping people living with Parkison’s Disease Di Lymbury was awarded Lismore Citizen of the Year. 

RAT upcycling available in Mullum

Most of us have been far more concerned about how to get hold of rapid antigen tests (RATs) over the past few months than what happens to the plastic testing kits after use.

Bill will not prevent social media trolling: Law Council

The nation’s peak law advocay legal body, The Law Council of Australia, is calling for a nationally consistent approach to law reform as ‘the best defence against social media defamation’.