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Wallaby deaths around Cape Byron prompt dog baiting

Poison baits will be used in the Cape Byron area in a bid to remove a wild dog believed to have killed several six wallabies in recent weeks.

National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) says the poison 1080 will be used in Arakwal National Park and Cape Byron State Conservation Area where the dead wallabies, some of which had been partly eaten, were found.

NPWS Byron Coast area manager Sue Walker said baiting was planned to begin on Monday and continue until 30 June if required.

‘This is in response to impacts to local wildlife as last week two wallabies were killed by a dog,’ Sue said.

‘The baiting will be undertaken in accordance with the North Coast Local Land Services Wild Dog Management Plans and NPWS Northern Rivers Regional Pest Management Strategy,’ she said.

‘NPWS staff have been using a cage trap however it appears the dog is avoiding this.

‘Baiting will now be included as part of its control technique to remove the predator from the park.

‘Neighbours and visitors are reminded to take measures to ensure that domestic animals do not roam into the park.

‘Signs will be located in areas where baits have been laid indicating the date baits were placed.

‘Delays may occur due to unsuitable weather conditions and associated restricted access.

‘People are reminded that dogs are not permitted within national parks and dog owners face a $300 fine if detected in the Park.

‘To report a wild dog or fox sighting on Byron national parks land, contact the Byron Coast Area Office on 02 6620 9300.

‘Across various NPWS parks and reserves in the Northern Rivers, wild dog  and fox control programs are underway to reduce the numbers of wild dogs and foxes, their impacts leading up to their breeding season.

‘In urban areas NPWS encourages our neighbours and landholders to report wild dog or fox incidents to local Councils and the North Coast Livestock Health and Pest Authority as soon as they occur so that the information can be recorded and an appropriate coordinated response be swift and effective,’ Ms Walker said.

To report a wild dog on private property (rural/urban lands) you can report it to the North Coast Local Land Services on 02 6623 3900.

 

 


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