Menu

Next two Lismore Recycled Markets cancelled

A photo taken at the Lismore Recycled Market  includes (front l-r) local musician Keith Hartley, Market Coordinator Robyn Kelly and Lismore City Council’s Waste Education Officer Danielle Hanigan with stallholders (rear l-r) jewellery craftsman Clive Wilson, Jennifer Edwards from Tribal Barbi, Paul Flood and Bob Sheldrick from Grumpy Grandpops Woodcraft and Johnny and Helene Thompson from Dirty Old Town Furniture. (Terra Sword)

A photo taken at the Lismore Recycled Market includes (front l-r) local musician Keith Hartley, Market Coordinator Robyn Kelly and Lismore City Council’s Waste Education Officer Danielle Hanigan with stallholders (rear l-r) jewellery craftsman Clive Wilson, Jennifer Edwards from Tribal Barbi, Paul Flood and Bob Sheldrick from Grumpy Grandpops Woodcraft and Johnny and Helene Thompson from Dirty Old Town Furniture. (Terra Sword)

The Lismore City Council has cancelled the next two Lismore Recycled Markets in preparation for a special market in November to celebrate the 15th birthday of Northern Rivers Waste.

Northern Rivers Waste is the waste operations arm of Lismore City Council, which has seen extraordinary growth over the last decade and a half to become a leader in recycling innovation.

North Rivers Waste’s birthday event coincides with National Recycling Week and Council is hosting a special open day with bus tours and competitions, a big recycled market, interactive children’s activities and much more.

To ensure lots of stallholders can be secured for the event, Council has decided to cancel the Lismore Recycled Markets on the third Saturday in September and October.

‘We would like to have a really special day with lots for families to enjoy so we decided to have a break from the market in the lead-up to the open day,’ Waste Operations Coordinator Kevin Trustum said.

‘It’s a very special occasion for us – it is hard to believe just how much we have changed in 15 years.’

Kevin explained that Lismore was once just like any other tip: there was a large hole in the ground and people would pull up and throw their rubbish in the heap.

‘These days our landfill is lined with a geosynthetic clay liner to stop any leaching of toxins, and all old landfill is capped with native vegetation – a practice Lismore City Council pioneered in NSW,’ Kevin said.

‘We have an award-winning Materials Recovery Facility, are one of the few councils that can recycle soft plastics and we crush old glass for use in local roads. These days, 80% of all our operations are powered by solar from our own rooftop solar arrays. The advances in technology and in how we think about our recycling is phenomenal. Lismore is particularly progressive in wanting to deal with what we consume in our own backyard and we have absolutely set a benchmark for other councils to follow.’

The Northern Rivers Waste 15th birthday open day is on Saturday, 19 November from 9am to 2pm at 313 Wyrallah Road, East Lismore. All activities are free and everyone is welcome.

 


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Become a supporter of The Echo

A note from the editorial team

Some of The Echo’s editorial team: journalists Paul Bibby and Aslan Shand, editor Hans Lovejoy, photographer Jeff Dawson and Mandy Nolan

The Echo has never underestimated the intelligence and passion of its readers. In a world of corporate banality and predictability, The Echo has worked hard for more than 30 years to help keep Byron and the north coast unique with quality local journalism and creative ideas. We think this area needs more voices, reasoned analysis and ideas than just those provided by News Corp, lifestyle mags, Facebook groups and corporate newsletters.

The Echo is one hundred per cent locally owned and one hundred per cent independent. As you have probably gathered from what is happening in the media industry, it is not cheap to produce a weekly newspaper and a daily online news service of any quality.

We have always relied entirely on advertising to fund our operations, but often loyal readers who value our local, independent journalism have asked how they could help ensure our survival.

Any support you can provide to The Echo will make an enormous difference. You can make a one-off contribution or a monthly one. With your help, we can continue to support a better informed local community and a healthier democracy for another 30 years.”

Echonetdaily is made possible by the support of all of our advertisers.