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Byron Shire
February 22, 2024

Sewerage and the Byron GM

Latest News

An adventure of a different kind

Two years ago adventurer Emma Scattergood discovered that a journey doesn’t always involve travel. In 2022, Emma was told she had stage 3 invasive lobular breast cancer. 

Other News

‘Mandatory’ pesticide spraying deferred at Bruns pod village

Flood-affected residents have had a last-minute reprieve by the NSW Reconstruction Authority, who had planned to spray controversial pesticides at the Bruns pod village.

Mary McMorrow

Thank you Mary for your letter in last week’s Echo supporting Israel in its efforts to remove Hamas and...

Small breweries feeling the pinch

Like many small businesses doing it tough, local independent breweries are no exception. The number of small to medium-sized independent craft breweries falling into administration is growing.

Wallum update: protectors at the ready

The fight to save the Wallum heathland in Brunswick Heads has gone into overdrive, with dozens of locals staunchly holding the line on-site, while thousands more lobby state and federal politicians in pursuit of permanent protection.

Wallum vote

Lyon, Swivel, Pugh and Hunter voted on Thursday to let the bulldozers in and destroy Wallum. The Byron electorate...

Matcha Byron

The cornerstone of traditional Japanese tea ceremonies for centuries, matcha is enjoying a burst of popularity for its health benefits. It’s finely ground green tea – its vibrant colour is due to the leaves’ high chlorophyll levels, and it’s supercharged with antioxidants.

Alan Dickens, Brunswick Heads

Suzanne Sticka’s letter in Echonetdaily 11/10/2016 talked about dirty and overflowing toilets at Wategos.

A question for Byron Shire Council GM Ken Gainger, who has argued in the Echo previously that BSC water and sewer staff are so much more qualified now than previous staff, plus the technology is much more advanced and efficient now. So how is it possible for public toilets at Wategos to overflow?

The overflow could have been caused by pump station failure or blockage in the gravity main from the toilet to the pump station. If the pump station had failed there would have been a telemetry alarm and a three-hour window for someone to respond. Alternatively, if there was a blockage in the gravity main how did the toilets get to the overflowing stage before it was cleared?

This incident questions Mr Gainger stance about the improved efficiency of water and recycling. As GM, perhaps it is appropriate for him to ask the questions about how this occurred.

 


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Police confirm two babies dead on February 11 in Mullumbimby

NSW Police have confirmed that at about 2am Sunday 11 February, emergency services were called to a home in Mullumbimby following reports of a concern for welfare.

Just what the doctor and nurses and midwives ordered

It seems like nurses and midwives are always struggling under the weight of poor patient-to-staff ratios. It is hoped that an influx of new workers could help ease the load. This will be a welcome relief for local staff.

Affordable housing summit next week

As the affordable housing issue shows no signs of easing in the near future, key figures in the housing, property, and finance sectors will come together to tackle the country’s housing challenges at the ninth Affordable Housing Development & Investment Summit

Lorikeets on the mend as paralysis season eases

A poorly-understood phenomenon where lorikeets in the region becoming paralysed and unable to fly is thankfully coming to an end for 2024, says WIRES wildlife vet, Dr Tania Bishop.