22.8 C
Byron Shire
May 16, 2022

80 turn out to rescue the Richmond River

Latest News

Interviews with Richmond candidates 2022: Independent Terry Sharples

Terry Sharples is a retired accountant living in the Tweed Shire and running as an Independent for the federal...

Other News

Red hot Stoner experience

I was lucky enough to visit Stone & Wood recently to see the initial brew being made of the 2022 Stone Beer, the star attraction at the upcoming Festival of the Stone at Stone & Wood’s Byron brewery site on Saturday 4 June.

What happens after two years?

The recent floods have left many people homeless. Trying to address this problem, local councils have waived some of...

Mullumbimby Rotary Club offering $500 grants for flood victims

The Mullumbimby Rotary Club has raised $20,000 to help locals impacted by the floods.

It’s National Volunteer Week

Volunteering Australia says volleys are the backbone of the country in times of crisis and emergency.

Entertainment in the Byron Shire for the week beginning 11 May, 2022

It couldn’t be funnier if it was in Byron… oh wait! The Byron Comedy Fest is a carefully curated event...

Cartoon of the week – 11 May, 2022

The Echo loves your letters and is proud to provide a community forum on the issues that matter most to our readers and the people of the NSW north coast. So don't be a passive reader, send us your epistles.

The Richmond River estuary at Ballina was rated F in a 2015 Ecohealth report. Photo environment.nsw.gov.au
The Richmond River estuary at Ballina was rated F in a 2015 Ecohealth report. Photo environment.nsw.gov.au

Over 80 community members representing various farming, Landcare and environment groups attended the inaugural meeting of the Richmond River Rescue on Wednesday night at the Lismore City Hall.

Convened by aspiring Nationals Party politician and former Telstra spin doctor, Rod Bruem, the meeting was called to gauge community support to establish a new environmental action group to focus on the important issues of restoring the Richmond River and its tributaries.

‘Richmond River is a disgrace and by any measure it’s getting worse not better,’ Mr Breum said.

He said the issue needed to be addressed now and addressed loudly by local stakeholders.

However, a split in community consensus rapidly became clear when co-convenor Phil Terry, a local farm owner, stated that the group did not want to see unnecessary laws such as mandatory fencing along river banks or other run off initiatives imposed on farmers whose land adjoins the river.

Landcare groups and local Greens Councillor Vanessa Ekins, having just heard from SCU Professor Amanda Reichelt-Brushett that farming activities over the past century were the largest cause of river degradation, did not warm to Terry’s   position believing farmers needed to make reparations for their impact.

Other groups at the meeting queried the need for the existence of yet another river group but Rod Bruem maintained his goal was to bring all the existing groups under one umbrella to lobby for Federal funding.

The meeting in Lismore will be followed by a meeting in Ballina today, Thursday 23 February, at the Ballina Richmond River Room adjacent to the Library commencing at 6pm.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

4 COMMENTS

  1. I remember my father telling me that he and friends used to jump off the wilson creek bridge at low tide to who could touch the bottom and that no one ever did because it was too deep (1930s)and watching coastal frieght steamers unloading at the docks at lismore.last time i visited the area you could see the bottom quite clearly.far too much silt has built up in our coastal river systems which i believe is why floods are much worse now than before.dredge them back to original levels.re use the silt.

  2. I remember my father telling me that he and friends used to jump off the wilson creek bridge at low tide to see who could touch the bottom and that no one ever did because it was too deep (1930s)and watching coastal frieght steamers unloading at the docks at lismore.last time i visited the area you could see the bottom quite clearly.far too much silt has built up in our coastal river systems which i believe is why floods are much worse now than before.dredge them back to original levels.re use the silt.

  3. What is the issue with mandatory fencing along the river ? There’s an abundance of water cattle don’t need to drink from the river fencing is a bit of a no brainer surely ?

  4. All creek access, both for livestock use and domestic consumption should be curtailed.

    We still get enough rainfall here in our region to collect via water tanks off our roof or small dams holdings.

    The other big issue is farm and herbicide run off. Traces of herbicides have been found in our marine environment and when land care use 2 litres to poison a tree on a river bank it is a fact there is leeching into the water. A few hundred poisoned trees? A no brainer and a common sense response is needed.

    And then there are the land holders who use herbicides to do their whipper snipping and manicuring, often directly into drains.

    The other fact is people have been seen stealing rocks from creek beds in the Byron Shire, I have witnessed this, confrontations have occurred when suggesting it is the wrong thing to be doing.

    Councils should lead the way in better practice and issue guide lines to all new comers to this increasingly degraded area. Byron declared a couple of years ago it would stop using herbicides on public land, I think a 3 year phase out period was mooted. Where does that promise stand today?

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Releasing the chokehold on Australia’s water

What the trading of 40 gigalitres of water from the Barmah Choke means for the Murray Darling Basin.

COVID-19 update: May 16

The Northern NSW Local Health District says that to 4pm yesterday, 15 May, 384 new cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in the District, including 82 positive PCR tests and 302 positive rapid antigen tests.

‘Unprecedented’ but not unpredicted – we are now suffering from our failure to listen to scientists’ predictions of the impacts of climate change 30...

As Australians head into another election season just as many parts of the east coast are recovering from ‘unprecedented’ flooding since February, and the national psyche is still reeling from the trauma of the ‘unprecedented’ Black Summer bushfires before that, it is critical now more than ever to vote according to your environmental conscience and fear for the future.

2022 Community Building Partnership Program

Lismore MP Janelle Saffin is encouraging local not-for-profit groups and councils to apply for their share of $400,000 in grants under the 2022 Community Building Partnership Program.