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One whale, two whales…

Orca Whale Watching co-ordinator Tiffany-Lee wears her heart on her sleeve. Showing her commitment to Cetacean welfare is more than just skin deep. Tiffany-Lee and half a dozen other 'Orrca' volunteers had counted 62 whales passing the cape at Byron by 10;30 on Sunday morning. Photo Jeff 'whale washer' Dawson.

Orca Whale Watching co-ordinator Tiffany-Lee wears her heart on her sleeve. Showing her commitment to Cetacean welfare is more than just skin deep. Tiffany-Lee and half a dozen other ‘Orrca’ volunteers had counted 62 whales passing the cape at Byron by 10;30 on Sunday morning.
Photo Jeff ‘whale washer’ Dawson.

Over 1000 people headed to Cape Byron Lighthouse on Sunday to learn more about whales and join in the official whale count for 2017.

‘It was fantastic and the weather was great,’ said Aboriginal education officer Delta Kay.

‘From 7am to 4pm we counted 171 whales, two more than last year.’

Two hundred to 500 humpback whales were estimated to have been left in the 1960s as the whaling industry came to a close. This year ORRCA (Organisation for the Rescue and Research of Cetaceans in Australia) and National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) are estimating that there will be around 30,000 whales that will pass by the NSW coast during the 2017 whale watching season.

‘The humpback whale migration is a conservation success story,’ NPWS area manager Sue Walker said.

NPWS staff members worked alongside ORRCA volunteers on Sunday as visitors stopped to read the display and find out information about the whales and whale migration.


One response to “One whale, two whales…”

  1. Steve says:

    Bloody whale time again. Must be the most boring event of the year.

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