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Byron Shire
March 5, 2021

Million driverless vehicles by 2035: NRMA

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Driverless cars may soon be a common sight. Photo traffman/Flickr.com
Driverless cars may soon be a common sight. Photo traffman/Flickr.com

One million driverless cars will be on Australian roads by 2035 and people could access the vehicles under a Netflix-styled subscription service, according to a report from motoring body NRMA.

The six-month study into Australia’s driverless future says car ownership would drop substantially as people leased vehicles on a subscription basis, while driver’s licences would become redundant.

The major beneficiaries would be the young, elderly and disabled, who could be allowed to control driverless cars by the mid-2020s, the report obtained by The Australian says.

“People with epilepsy, narcolepsy, sensory disability, as well as the elderly and the young who are unable to hold a traditional driver’s licence, will be able to use point-to-point transport that meets their needs,” the report says.

NRMA president Kyle Loades says driving skills will become a thing of the past.

“By the late 2020s, it’s likely to come to a point where you jump in your autonomous vehicle to go from Sydney to Brisbane or Melbourne at, say, 10pm, go to sleep while your vehicle drives you, and save on a night’s accommodation,” he said.

The federal National Transport Commission is investigating the introduction of driverless vehicles into Australia, and road rules could be changed as early as 2020, The Australian reports.


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