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First Manus, Nauru detainees leave for US

Asylum seekers staring at media from behind a fence at the Oscar compound in the Manus Island detention centre, Papua New Guinea.  (AAP Image/Eoin Blackwell)

Asylum seekers staring at media from behind a fence at the Oscar compound in the Manus Island detention centre, Papua New Guinea. (AAP Image/Eoin Blackwell)

The first group of asylum seekers from Australia’s offshore detention centres have flown out of the country for a new life in the US.

The Daily Telegraph reports 25 men from the Manus Island and Nauru facilities left on Tuesday from Port Moresby airport in Papua New Guinea.

Another 27 are due to leave later this week.

The men had arrived in Australian waters by boat years ago and were transferred to the centres under a strict government policy not to allow any such persons to set foot on Australian soil.

They were recently cleared by US authorities for resettlement under a deal struck between the former Obama administration and the Turnbull government.

In total, up to 1250 asylum seekers are expected to be resettled in the US.


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