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Four major Lismore decisions subject to rescission motions

Lismore GM Gary Murphy is today considering four recision motions lodged after last night’s meeting.

Four major items on last night’s Lismore City Council agenda could return in the new year after four rescission motions were lodged following the meeting last night.

A majority of councillors had voted to proceed with a workshop for the Lismore Square Shopping Centre $9o million expansion; to proceed with negotiations over an Olympic Ski Jump facility; a special business rate variation; and an extra 20 races each year at the Lismore Greyhound Racing track.

But Greens councillors Vanessa Ekins and Adam Guise joined with Cr Eddie Lloyd in lodging the rescission motions against the ski jump, the shopping centre expansion and the greyhound racing.

The special business rate variation motion was for the council to apply to the NSW Independent Pricing & Regulator Tribunal (IPART) for a permanent Business Special Rate Variation (SRV) at a rate pegged level of $120,000 per annum, commencing 1 July 2018.

Crs Greg Bennet, Nancy Casson and Adam Guise have lodged a rescission motion to reverse the decision to proceed.

Meanwhile, the council’s general manager Gary Murphy has the ultimate say in whether the rescission motions proceed,  having to consider their legality.

It’s understood that all the motions are likely to be approved although there are legal questions regarding the greyhound races decision.

More to come. 

 

 


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