11.5 C
Byron Shire
July 18, 2024

Old STP site is wonderful bird habitat

Latest News

Regional ratios rollout NSW begins in Lismore

The NSW Nurses and Midwives’ Association (NSWNMA) has welcomed the announcement of nurse-to-patient ratios at two regional NSW hospitals but has expressed concern over the pace of the phased rollout.

Other News

Traffic chaos?

I note that water mains replacement is soon to be undertaken on Bangalow Road, Byron Bay. Timeframe July to...

Celebrating NAIDOC Week in Byron Bay

Celebrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and achievements NAIDOC Week is an opportunity to recognise the contributions Indigenous Australians make to our country and society.

Renewed appeal for information after human remains located – Coffs Harbour

Police have renewed their appeal for information after human remains were located at a Coffs Harbour beach last month.

Free coercive control community forum tonight in Kingscliff

What is coercive control? Is it really something we can define and work out how to respond to? The...

Arabs rights

Regarding Heilpern’s article: 1. Not a token of non-Jews serve in the army. By and large the whole Muslim...

Two in hospital, including officer, after perilous arrest

A Northern Rivers man wanted for arrest and an officer trying to arrest him are both in hospital after a disastrous encounter in the early hours of the morning.

David Gilet, Byron Bay.

When the development of the old sewage works was first suggested I wrote a letter enumerating the number of bird species that I had observed on the old sedimentary ponds. I think it may be appropriate to repeat this information.

I used to walk my dog past the ponds three or four times a week over a five-year period. I observed wood duck, pacific black duck coots, water hens, little grebes black swans, hardhead ducks while herons and egrets hunted around the margins. But that was just the freshwater birds – it was also used by pelicans, gulls and terns particularly during stormy weather.

The problem is that all of these birds are not present all of the time and there are times when no birds are present at all. It is nonetheless an important refuge for all local water birds. Also building houses along the area will restrict the north and south movement of animals to a narrow strip between the path and the beach which makes them vulnerable to predation. A developer will undoubtedly want to fill in the ponds which are also a source of drinking water for mammals and reptiles.

 


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Healthy lifestyle program for Lismore and Tweed families

The Northern NSW Local Health District says that families can access support to build healthy habits together, including tips and assistance for getting active, healthy eating and overall wellbeing.

Artists donate work for Wallum cause

They say art imitates life, but can it also save life? This is the ultimate goal of the Save Wallum Art Exhibition and fundraiser that opened at Gallery Cosmosis in Byron Bay on Friday night.

850 women with sticks in Lismore and Ballina

The Goonellabah Hockey Centre and the Ballina Hockey Centre are about to be inundated with women and their big sticks as Lismore teams up with Ballina to host the NSW Northern Division Women's Masters Hockey Championships.

Macquarie Marshes under threat from mining

If it hasn't been hard enough protecting the Macquarie Marshes from drought because of the upstream cotton growers now farmers are faced with a new threat to this environmentally significant, Ramsar-listed area.