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It’s time for the girls to take art to the streets

Public art can be both empowering and challenging as well as challenged and the In.scribe Project, run by the Byron Youth Service, has been mentoring young creatives in the shire for many years.

The project has helped create public murals in Brunswick Heads, Ocean Shores, Suffolk Park and at the Byron Community Centre.

‘A public art project is a great way to bring people together to celebrate their neighbourhood and feel a part of something bigger,’ says In.scribe facilitator, Karma Barnes.

Girls own the streets

Byron Youth Service is offering places in the in.scribe program, that is free for teen girls aged 12 to 18, to experiment and experience what street art has to offer.

‘It’s an amazing opportunity for young people who are creative and want to see where they can take it,’ says Berri Drum, who’s organising the program.

The street art program will be starting o May 30 and they are looking for teen girls who are interested in getting involved. For more information head to the Byron Youth Service In.scribe webpage and submit your application.


One response to “It’s time for the girls to take art to the streets”

  1. Simon says:

    As dynamic and empowering as a project like this is, why is it exclusively targeted at girls? You talk of ’empowering’ and ‘bringing people together’… why be exclusive to one gender? It is young men and teenage boys who are often struggling most to feel part of our modern society, finding local employment, education, an expression of physicality and social inclusion often much more difficult than for girls of the same age. It is a shame that a project like this isn’t more inclusive – leaving gender out of it completely, and including people just for being teenagers.

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