20.2 C
Byron Shire
May 6, 2021

Accounting for mangrove methane in global carbon budgets

Latest News

From go to whoa – Norco Primex expo covers it all

Norco and Primex are bringing a three-day sustainable farming and primary industry expo to you.

Other News

Lismore Council set to increase fees, cut costs in a bid to balance budget

Lismore City Council is set to increase fees and charges and cut spending in an attempt to overcome a $19.5m operating deficit.

Boarding houses

Matthew O’Reilly, CABS president and Council candidate for the new Byron Greens The over-development of cramped boarding-house accommodation in Sunrise...

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: Killer Crocs!

When I was 18, to rebel against the world my parents had created, I shaved a half Mohawk, encouraged my hair to stand on end, grew my armpit hair, wore torn black rags, too much eyeliner and wore 18-hole Dr. Martens boots. These days, to give their parents the shits, the kids are wearing Crocs. With socks. They’re going for comfort.

Byron Bay’s first ever matured spirit wins gold medal at London Spirit Competition

While the Northern Rivers region is well known for its environment and lifestyle, it is also becoming known for...

Northern Star dimming under Murdoch shadow

As democracy advocates and journalists around the world did their best to acknowledge World Press Freedom Day on May 3, in regional Australia, The Northern Star was dimming.

Kingscliff man charged over rape allegations

Tweed Byron police have arrested a 35-year-old Kingscliff man over rape allegations.

Dr Judith Rosentreter enjoying the ambience of a mangrove system. Photo supplied.

Mangroves are highly valued for their efficiency in storing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. But those calculations need to be adjusted to account for the methane emitted during the carbon burial process, according to new research from Southern Cross University.

Organic material within the mangrove system releases methane as it breaks down. However, scientists from the University’s Centre for Coastal Biogeochemistry Research have found the methane being released is offsetting on average 20 per cent of the carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere and buried as blue carbon.

The paper ‘Methane emissions partially offset ‘blue carbon’ burial in mangroves’, published in the journal Science Advances, provides the first estimate of the global magnitude of this offset.

‘Our results show that high water and sediment methane emissions have the potential to partially offset “blue carbon” burial rates in mangrove sediments on average by 20 per cent,’ said lead researcher Dr Judith Rosentreter.

‘The offsets may be as high as 60 per cent around the boundary between the tropics and subtropics, driven by lower mangrove carbon burial rates and higher methane emissions.

‘Although there are some uncertainties associated with global emission estimates of methane – mainly owing to the lack of data from countries with large mangrove areas such as Indonesia or Brazil – the overall conclusion that there are some offsets remain the same.’

Professor Bradley Eyre, director of the Centre for Coastal Biogeochemistry Research at Southern Cross, is one of the co-authors.

‘Methane emissions from mangroves need to be accounted for when assessing their importance in future “blue carbon” assessments and climate change mitigation,’ said Professor Eyre.

As well as offering valuable ecosystem services to the coastal zone and its inhabitants, coastal vegetated ecosystems have been highlighted as efficient natural carbon stores. The term blue carbon was coined to describe the carbon sequestered in sediments of mangroves, seagrasses and salt marshes and considered as a long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Yet mangrove and other coastal wetlands are threatened ecosystems needing protection and conservation.

Climate change is driven primarily by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere (owing to burning of fossil fuel). Climate change mitigation strategies include emission reduction and preserving and enhancing natural carbon stores.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Greater Sydney goes into COVID related lockdown

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has just announced that greater Sydney area will go into lockdown until next Monday.

Board defends its management of Mullum Rural Co-op

The issue of potential fraud and financial mismanagement was a key part of the response from Mullumbimby Rural Co-op board, and Chair Ross Tucker,...

An operetta and children’s theatre for NORPA

NOPRA has announced recipients of the theatre company’s two artist residencies.

Dam doesn’t give a damn about koalas

The proposed Dunoon Dam is still a possibility, though it has been voted against twice by the members of Rous County Council. Now information has emerged which presents another reason to shut down the threat of the dam once and for all.