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Rail compromise

Dean Chalker, Mullum Creek

Regarding the stoush between those to preserve the Murwillumbah railway line for future railway operations and those who would use the space for walkers and cyclists – has anyone looked at what Rail Track Riders of Maydena, Tasmania are doing with their disused railway?

Perhaps something akin could be an acceptable middleground that would not require expensive and prolonged works.


4 responses to “Rail compromise”

  1. Gary Ainsworth says:

    Great idea. I think there was a similar letter to this in the Echo a few weeks ago. That’s not a bad thing though. It’s a fantastic idea. Pedal cars are a cheap and easy way of introducing tourism onto the line without spending enormous amounts removing it. Pedal cars theme-selves are very cheap, and big dollars could be saved in the refurbishment of the line given the weight of the pedal cars is next-to-nothing. A winning solution that can be very easily implemented in the short term.

  2. Jack says:

    Great concept ! All it requires is someone with vision who wants to foster local tourism to provide the pedal powered cars for hire, or for individuals to construct their own pedal powered vehicles. See photos in the Maydena web site. http://www.railtrackriders.com.au/

  3. Jimbo J says:

    How do you go in two directions at once without crashing into another car on one rail?

    • Peter Hatfield says:

      Easy Jimbo. You build a community path on which walkers, cycles and other slow paced travellers – including tandem and family bicycles, tricycles and quadricycles- can come and go as they please.

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