Menu

Hold Adani to account for pollution

Politicians are lying when they say a coal industry can co-exist with the Great Barrier Reef. Photo AAP Image/Supplied by Greenpeace, Dean Miller.

The Australian Marine Conservation Society is calling on the Queensland Government to hold Adani to account, following media revelations the company knew it would pollute the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area during Cyclone Debbie and breach their special licence to pollute by up to 900 per cent.

Dr Lissa Schindler, AMCS Senior Reef Campaigner, said: ‘According to media reports Adani actually suspected that its water on site was more polluted than what was allowed to be released into our Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area during Cyclone Debbie. This demonstrates yet again that Adani can’t be trusted with our Reef.

‘To knowingly allow this water to be released and pollute the area surrounding the Abbot Point coal terminal would be to recklessly risk the health of our threatened dugongs, turtles, snubfin dolphins and the nationally significant Caley Valley Wetlands.

‘How can Adani challenge its measly $12,000 fine and fight an environmental assessment of Abbot Point when it reportedly knew it would pollute the Reef and breach its licence before the cyclone hit?

‘This is blatantly unacceptable to everyone who loves the Reef, let alone depends on it for their livelihoods. The Queensland Government must fight for our Reef and hold Adani accountable for this coal pollution.’


2 responses to “Hold Adani to account for pollution”

  1. Joe says:

    Kick Adani out of town!

  2. Benjamin says:

    Just $12 000? barely looks like a license to pollute fee, let alone enough to cover some administrative costs

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Become a supporter of The Echo

A note from the editorial team

Some of The Echo’s editorial team: journalists Paul Bibby and Aslan Shand, editor Hans Lovejoy, photographer Jeff Dawson and Mandy Nolan

The Echo has never underestimated the intelligence and passion of its readers. In a world of corporate banality and predictability, The Echo has worked hard for more than 30 years to help keep Byron and the north coast unique with quality local journalism and creative ideas. We think this area needs more voices, reasoned analysis and ideas than just those provided by News Corp, lifestyle mags, Facebook groups and corporate newsletters.

The Echo is one hundred per cent locally owned and one hundred per cent independent. As you have probably gathered from what is happening in the media industry, it is not cheap to produce a weekly newspaper and a daily online news service of any quality.

We have always relied entirely on advertising to fund our operations, but often loyal readers who value our local, independent journalism have asked how they could help ensure our survival.

Any support you can provide to The Echo will make an enormous difference. You can make a one-off contribution or a monthly one. With your help, we can continue to support a better informed local community and a healthier democracy for another 30 years.”

Echonetdaily is made possible by the support of Vast Ballina, Bangalow Bluegrass Festival and all of our advertisers.