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Byron Shire
May 24, 2022

Planning’s cheap

Latest News

Bringing learning and play together

Byron Bay High School’s new agility course recognises the importance of play for learning and has students from all years actively playing during breaks and PDHPE lessons, according to Byron Bay High’s Principal, Janine Marcus.

Other News

Richmond candidates 2022: The Nationals – Kimberly Hone

Kimberly Hone lives in the Tweed Shire and is running as a candidate for The Nationals in the federal seat of Richmond.

Kevin Hogan returns for Page

Though the coalition government he represents is now in opposition, National Party candidate for Page, Kevin Hogan, has been returned to his seat and yesterday he released a statement to all media.

Review of community response called for as challenges recognised

Local community members stepped forward to help coordinate and respond to the disaster; from people getting into boats and kayaks recusing strangers in Lismore to coordinating local response hubs in the hinterland and local towns. But it wasn't all a bed of roses.

Secret agreements and done deals

Government and Byron Council refuse to explain details around temporary accommodation plans

Bringing learning and play together

Byron Bay High School’s new agility course recognises the importance of play for learning and has students from all years actively playing during breaks and PDHPE lessons, according to Byron Bay High’s Principal, Janine Marcus.

Passports

I have been subscribing to The Echo since my daughter moved to Mullumbimby late last year and I visited...

Greg Davies, Byron Bay

I write in support of Paul Jones (Echo, 19 December, 2018) and the host of others who have tried during the past 30 years to find agreement for a Byron Bay road bypass: as a standalone issue and as integral to the town Masterplan.

The secrecy of the terms for the privatisation of the rail corridor (Bangalow Road to Lawson Street) agreed between Council and Transport NSW smells like three-day-old prawn waste.

After more than a decade of a strictly out-of-bounds policy applied by the railway owner (trains ceased in 2004) the public have apparently been blinded to the most significant change in planning in Byron Bay this century: opening the rail corridor for development.

That development significantly expands the previously constrained possibilities for both the Butler Street bypass route and consequently amended Masterplan that were approved by Council in 2016. The public will have been ‘sold the dummy’ if only the plan for the proposed bus interchange is offered for feedback.

Clearly, a proper process of consultation is now needed to revisit and improve upon those previously approved plans.

Planning is cheap compared with the cost of the planned infrastructure.


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