24.8 C
Byron Shire
September 18, 2021

NSW state election 2019

Latest News

Police arrest 32 in protests across the state

Police say they have prevented the mass gathering of people in various locations across NSW, arresting 32 people and issuing 265 Penalty Infringement Notices in a coordinated and mobile response to planned protest activity.

Other News

New ocean temperature data help scientists make their hot predictions

We’ve heard that rising temperatures will lead to rising sea levels, but what many may not realise is that most of the increase in energy in the climate system is occurring in the ocean.  

From Lismore XR to multi-faith ARRCC – now is the time for climate action

From XR to religious multi-faith networks the call is becoming stronger for real action on climate change.

Creatives feature in Lismore plan

Creative industries, climate resilience, building more homes and supporting a flourishing food sector are all aspirations within a 15-year vision for Lismore.

Farewell Sue – a much-loved Mullumbimbian

You could say that Sue Mallam was destined to run a business in Mullumbimby.

On being prepared

In recent commentary on the Commonwealth’s proposed quarantine facility in Brisbane, Simon Birmingham said, ‘Whilst it will be used...

COVID venues of concern at Evans Head and Lismore

Three new venues of concern have been added to the list of COVID-19 venues of concern following a student...

Voters in the Ballina electorate (Byron and Ballina Council areas) have six candidates to choose from.

In order of the ballot and the above photo montage (left to right) they are: Keep Sydney Open’s James Wright, Animal Justice Party’s Cathy Blasonato, Labor’s Asren Pugh, Greens’ Tamara Smith, Sustainable Australia’s Lisa Mcdermott and Nationals’ Ben Franklin.

A NSW election primer

The current MP for the Ballina electorate is Tamara Smith (Greens), who has held the seat for the past four years and is the first non-conservative to represent the Ballina area in 88 years.

Both Tweed and Lismore electorates are currently held by The Nationals by a slim margin. Tweed’s sitting member Geoff Provest will be fighting to hold his seat while Thomas George of Lismore is retiring.

Two parties are likely be elected to form a NSW government at the March 22 election.

They are NSW Liberal-National coalition (right wing) and NSW Labor (left wing). At the time of going to press it appears NSW Labor may snatch victory after eight years of the NSW Liberal-National coalition. Yet elections are foolish to predict considering modern day voter volatility.

Fun fact – the terms left and right come from the French around their revolution in the late 1700s: the wealthy sat to the right of the King while the peasants sat on the left. The peasants eventually cut the King’s head off, along with many others. Oh, what times.

So can the two major party system be voted out?

That would require almost every vote to be cast below the line for an independent. Most people vote above the line in the lower house, yet if you vote just 1 for your party, your vote will be wasted (exhausted). You should keep numbering your least wanted candidate last.

Many voters – along with journalists and politicians – struggle to understand the complex system as it is, thus ensuring governments are dominated by either party.

The NSW Liberal-National coalition comprises an alliance between the Liberal and National parties.

Their agreement stipulates that in regional areas such as the Ballina electorate, the Nationals Party will run a candidate, not the Liberals. In turn, the Liberals run candidates in city areas instead of the Nationals.

Labor is a party in its own right, but has generally relied on the Greens and like-minded cross bench MPs to get laws passed unless it has a thumping majority.

Where elections between the Liberal-National coalition and Labor are close, a balance of power emerges from the cross bench (Independents and Greens).

If you are wondering what politicians do for their $200,000 odd salary, they are supposed to uphold and carry out the functions and responsibilities of the NSW government. They include managing (or mismanaging) your taxes, which are distributed to the state by the federal government.

Elected state politicians create the illusion they direct policy on health, education, infrastructure, police, courts and local councils, for example. Yet without sounding cynical, it’s actually bureaucrats who control all forms of government.

The most powerful role politicians undertake is creating and voting on laws that affect every aspect of our lives.

That’s why it’s important to consider whether your vote will go towards a party that reflects your values. Elections are an ideal time to reflect on what those values are.

Hans Lovejoy, editor

Ballina electorate

Geography

Ballina electorate. Image from www.elections.nsw.gov.au

(from aec.gov.au)

Northern NSW. Ballina covers all of Ballina Shire and Byron Shire. The main towns in the seat are Ballina, Lennox Head, Byron Bay and Mullumbimby.
The seat of Ballina in its current form has existed since 1988, and it was held by the Nationals continuously from 1988 until 2015. Another seat named Ballina existed from 1894 to 1904.

Ballina was created in 1988, when the pre-existing seat of Byron was broken up between Ballina and Murwillumbah. Ballina was won by Don Page, a grandson of former Country Party Prime Minister Earle Page. He served as deputy leader of the NSW National Party from 2003 to 2007, and held the seat until 2015. Page retired in 2015, and the seat was won by Greens candidate Tamara Smith, with a 20 per cent swing after preferences.

About and history (from aec.gov.au)

Ballina is a marginal seat, and the Greens shouldn’t take it for granted. A small swing back to the Nationals would see the seat revert to type. In 2015, the progressive vote was severely splintered between the Greens, Labor and an ex-Greens independent. Labor is still stronger in the southern parts of the electorate, and the Greens would be hoping to use their incumbency advantage to consolidate the progressive vote, to ensure they stay in the top two, and to help with reducing preference leakage.

Any analysis of Ballina undoubtedly becomes a tale of two councils. The Greens won a thumping majority in Byron Shire – winning about 73.5% of the two-candidate-preferred vote, and 44% of the primary vote. Ballina makes up a majority of the seat, and the Greens lost the two-candidate-preferred vote to the Nationals both in Ballina itself (41.3%) and in the surrounding areas (46%). The Greens were outpolled by Labor in both these areas, with a vote of only 15.7% in the town of Ballina. Labor’s primary vote ranged from 21.7% in Ballina Surrounds to 26% in Ballina. The low Greens vote in Ballina was likely worsened by the candidacy of Jeff Johnson, an independent candidate who had been twice elected as a Greens councillor in Ballina Shire. Johnson polled over 10% in both Ballina subareas, compared to less than 5% in Byron.

More on the NSW election:

NSW 2019 Tweed candidates

As Saturday draws ever closer and we sharpen our little tiny pencils, it’s important to remember that your votes count, and you need to know who you’re voting for –  then it will all be over and we wait to see what fate and vote and given us.

8

NSW 2019 Lismore candidates

As Saturday draws ever closer and we sharpen our little tiny pencils, it’s important to remember that your votes count, and you need to know who you’re voting for –  then it will all be over and we wait to see what fate and vote and given us.

0

NSW 2019 Ballina candidate policies

Echonetdaily has contacted all of the candidates for Ballina in the upcoming NSW election and have compiled their policies on a range of important issues.

0

NSW 2019 Ballina candidate profiles

In order of the ballot, the Ballina candidates are: Keep Sydney Open’s James Wright Thirty-six-year old year old radio broadcaster, filmmaker, futurist and father of three, James Wright has been a resident of the Byron Shire for five years. Working in the...

4

Will you be throwing your vote in the bin?

Who wins or loses local marginal seats during the NSW state elections is in your hands – or rather in the way you preference your vote.

5


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

COVID update – sewage detection in East and South Lismore and Byron Bay

Northern NSW Local Health District is urging people in the Lismore City and Byron Bay areas to get tested for COVID-19, after fragments of the virus were detected in samples from the East Lismore, South Lismore and Byron Bay sewage treatment plants.

The old slouch hat

‘This is my favourite,’ we say espite the painfully obvious fact that we all, from time to time enjoy a wide variety of hats. Jon Summers, Suffolk Park

The year 2000

I must answer David Heilpern. Remember 2000, how the computers were all to fail on NYE? How could so many get it so wrong? Why...

Viruses

Viruses are organisms at the edge of life and possess genes, evolve by natural selection, and reproduce by creating multiple copies of themselves through...