25.4 C
Byron Shire
February 25, 2024

NSW state election 2019

Latest News

Pain

I am about to undergo knee replacement surgery and have been advised by Tweed Hospital that as this is...

Other News

They got the Dojo Rise

Adam Blesing, Sean Dedrick and Anthony Sherwood are Dojo Rise – forging their own unique footprint in the music industry, with their uplifting south coast sound; an eclectic fusion of reggae/dub, pop and indie soul.

Tweed BMX freestyler wins national gold

Tweed-based BMX freestyler Will Spedding has backed up a state championship with a national title and is now set...

Man assaulted on M1

Witnesses of an assault on the Pacific Highway over the weekend are being asked to contact police as they investigate the alleged crime.

Punishment

There is a justice problem in criminal assault cases if a person who claims to have been assaulted makes...

Plan for looming battery crisis

Industry-led voluntary schemes will fail to address the environmental risks arising from battery disposal, according to the Total Environment Centre, as they release a plan for urgent regulation to establish an effective, mandatory product stewardship scheme to safely collect and recycle all battery types in Australia.

Cinema: Poor Things

With so many shades of Frankenstein, and featuring Emma Stone, Mark Ruffalo, Willem Dafoe and Ramy Youssef, Poor Things is set in Victorian London. Medical student Max McCandles (Youssef) becomes an assistant to the eccentric surgeon Dr Godwin ‘God’ Baxter (Dafoe) and falls in love with Godwin’s ward, Bella (Stone), a childlike young woman…

Voters in the Ballina electorate (Byron and Ballina Council areas) have six candidates to choose from.

In order of the ballot and the above photo montage (left to right) they are: Keep Sydney Open’s James Wright, Animal Justice Party’s Cathy Blasonato, Labor’s Asren Pugh, Greens’ Tamara Smith, Sustainable Australia’s Lisa Mcdermott and Nationals’ Ben Franklin.

A NSW election primer

The current MP for the Ballina electorate is Tamara Smith (Greens), who has held the seat for the past four years and is the first non-conservative to represent the Ballina area in 88 years.

Both Tweed and Lismore electorates are currently held by The Nationals by a slim margin. Tweed’s sitting member Geoff Provest will be fighting to hold his seat while Thomas George of Lismore is retiring.

Two parties are likely be elected to form a NSW government at the March 22 election.

They are NSW Liberal-National coalition (right wing) and NSW Labor (left wing). At the time of going to press it appears NSW Labor may snatch victory after eight years of the NSW Liberal-National coalition. Yet elections are foolish to predict considering modern day voter volatility.

Fun fact – the terms left and right come from the French around their revolution in the late 1700s: the wealthy sat to the right of the King while the peasants sat on the left. The peasants eventually cut the King’s head off, along with many others. Oh, what times.

So can the two major party system be voted out?

That would require almost every vote to be cast below the line for an independent. Most people vote above the line in the lower house, yet if you vote just 1 for your party, your vote will be wasted (exhausted). You should keep numbering your least wanted candidate last.

Many voters – along with journalists and politicians – struggle to understand the complex system as it is, thus ensuring governments are dominated by either party.

The NSW Liberal-National coalition comprises an alliance between the Liberal and National parties.

Their agreement stipulates that in regional areas such as the Ballina electorate, the Nationals Party will run a candidate, not the Liberals. In turn, the Liberals run candidates in city areas instead of the Nationals.

Labor is a party in its own right, but has generally relied on the Greens and like-minded cross bench MPs to get laws passed unless it has a thumping majority.

Where elections between the Liberal-National coalition and Labor are close, a balance of power emerges from the cross bench (Independents and Greens).

If you are wondering what politicians do for their $200,000 odd salary, they are supposed to uphold and carry out the functions and responsibilities of the NSW government. They include managing (or mismanaging) your taxes, which are distributed to the state by the federal government.

Elected state politicians create the illusion they direct policy on health, education, infrastructure, police, courts and local councils, for example. Yet without sounding cynical, it’s actually bureaucrats who control all forms of government.

The most powerful role politicians undertake is creating and voting on laws that affect every aspect of our lives.

That’s why it’s important to consider whether your vote will go towards a party that reflects your values. Elections are an ideal time to reflect on what those values are.

Hans Lovejoy, editor

Ballina electorate

Geography

Ballina electorate. Image from www.elections.nsw.gov.au

(from aec.gov.au)

Northern NSW. Ballina covers all of Ballina Shire and Byron Shire. The main towns in the seat are Ballina, Lennox Head, Byron Bay and Mullumbimby.
The seat of Ballina in its current form has existed since 1988, and it was held by the Nationals continuously from 1988 until 2015. Another seat named Ballina existed from 1894 to 1904.

Ballina was created in 1988, when the pre-existing seat of Byron was broken up between Ballina and Murwillumbah. Ballina was won by Don Page, a grandson of former Country Party Prime Minister Earle Page. He served as deputy leader of the NSW National Party from 2003 to 2007, and held the seat until 2015. Page retired in 2015, and the seat was won by Greens candidate Tamara Smith, with a 20 per cent swing after preferences.

About and history (from aec.gov.au)

Ballina is a marginal seat, and the Greens shouldn’t take it for granted. A small swing back to the Nationals would see the seat revert to type. In 2015, the progressive vote was severely splintered between the Greens, Labor and an ex-Greens independent. Labor is still stronger in the southern parts of the electorate, and the Greens would be hoping to use their incumbency advantage to consolidate the progressive vote, to ensure they stay in the top two, and to help with reducing preference leakage.

Any analysis of Ballina undoubtedly becomes a tale of two councils. The Greens won a thumping majority in Byron Shire – winning about 73.5% of the two-candidate-preferred vote, and 44% of the primary vote. Ballina makes up a majority of the seat, and the Greens lost the two-candidate-preferred vote to the Nationals both in Ballina itself (41.3%) and in the surrounding areas (46%). The Greens were outpolled by Labor in both these areas, with a vote of only 15.7% in the town of Ballina. Labor’s primary vote ranged from 21.7% in Ballina Surrounds to 26% in Ballina. The low Greens vote in Ballina was likely worsened by the candidacy of Jeff Johnson, an independent candidate who had been twice elected as a Greens councillor in Ballina Shire. Johnson polled over 10% in both Ballina subareas, compared to less than 5% in Byron.

More on the NSW election:

NSW 2019 Tweed candidates

As Saturday draws ever closer and we sharpen our little tiny pencils, it’s important to remember that your votes count, and you need to know who you’re voting for –  then it will all be over and we wait to see what fate and vote and given us.

8

NSW 2019 Lismore candidates

As Saturday draws ever closer and we sharpen our little tiny pencils, it’s important to remember that your votes count, and you need to know who you’re voting for –  then it will all be over and we wait to see what fate and vote and given us.

0

NSW 2019 Ballina candidate policies

Echonetdaily has contacted all of the candidates for Ballina in the upcoming NSW election and have compiled their policies on a range of important issues.

0

NSW 2019 Ballina candidate profiles

In order of the ballot, the Ballina candidates are: Keep Sydney Open’s James Wright Thirty-six-year old year old radio broadcaster, filmmaker, futurist and father of three, James Wright has been a resident of the Byron Shire for five years. Working in the...

4

Will you be throwing your vote in the bin?

Who wins or loses local marginal seats during the NSW state elections is in your hands – or rather in the way you preference your vote.

5


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Punishment

There is a justice problem in criminal assault cases if a person who claims to have been assaulted makes a formal complaint, such that...

Lighthouse Road

The section from the bus stop on Lighthouse Road to the divide of the road to Byron Bay, is totally unacceptable. It’s putrid for...

4,000 failed

I attended the flood forum held at the Ballina RSL last Monday and was aghast to hear some of the facts presented. 4,000 people...

Knitting Nannas get behind Save Wallum campaign

With porcelain tea cups, lace-covered tables and plenty of knitting the Knitting Nannas Against Greed (KNAG) headed to the basecamp of the Save Wallum...