21.7 C
Byron Shire
January 26, 2022

Byron markets are on the move

Latest News

Byron Shire 2022 Citizen of the Year

Jacqui Boyett, founder of the not-for-profit Global Ripple charity and op shop, is the Byron Shire 2022 Citizen of the Year.

Other News

1,051 new cases of COVID-19 for Northern Rivers

The Northern NSW Local Health District (NNSWLHD) saw 1,051 new cases of COVID-19 were confirmed to 8pm last night...

Entertainment in the Byron Shire for the week beginning 26 January, 2022

There's still loads of stuff on in the Byron Shire and beyond

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: Listening to the truth tellers

A long time ago my husband had to attend a meeting in Redfern. He works in the health and academic sector and it was a consultation with some First Nations clinicians and community workers. He arrived a little earlier for the meeting to the centre – not your typical clinical setting but a regular house. On arrival he was greeted by an older woman who led him to a table and offered him a cup of tea. They chatted. Had a laugh. She offered him a biscuit.

Ballina’s Citizen of the Year announcement to be livestreamed

As COVID 19 continues to make life complicated for people on the Northern Rivers and beyond, Ballina Shire Council has decided to livestream its Australia Day event, including the Citizen of the Year announcement, from 9am on Wednesday.

Reform needed to deliver electric trucks in Australia

With the aim of getting more electric-powered trucks on Australian roads, the Electric Vehicle Council and the Australian Trucking Association have collaborated to develop the policies necessary to drive Australian trucking into an electric future.

COVID update for January 24

Dr Kerry Chant spoke to the media this morning with a COVID update saying that in terms of our hospitals, we've currently got 2,816 People in hospital including 196 People in ICU, of whom 69 are ventilated.

Fresh and local produce at the Byron Farmers Market. Photo supplied.

Byron Bay’s monthly community market and the weekly farmers market are to be temporarily relocated for six months while the Byron bypass is being constructed.

From July the community market will move to the beachfront and the farmers market will move to the Cavanbah Centre, and locals and visitors who love the markets are urged to continue the great tradition of their monthly poke around artisan stalls or doing their weekly shop and buying produce.

Byron Shire Mayor Simon Richardson says the Byron markets are great cultural icons of the community. ‘They are amazing economic incubators and all councillors are strong supporters of the markets and the fabulous businesses that trade there,’ he said.

The operators of both markets have been working closely with Council for months, trying to find alternative sites for the markets.

‘Staff and market operators have gone through an exhaustive process to find temporary sites, on either council-managed or private land, that will accommodate stall holders and visitors and the beachfront and Cavanbah Centre are seen to be the most viable venues available,’ said Richardson.

Community Market stall holder Megan Campbell says it is a welcome relocation of the much-loved local market to Byron’s beachfront. ‘We’re looking forward and feel united to be bringing the very best we have to offer,’ she said.

Market manager Kate Hardman says that she is delighted to have an outcome that all stakeholders are satisfied with and believes the beachfront option was a clear frontrunner, as it ticked all the boxes from the start. ‘I’m really happy to see that the move to Byron beachside was supported unanimously by the Byron Markets Stallholder Relocation Committee,’ she said. ‘The location can accommodate all regular stall holders.

‘Although we’d prefer not to have to move, the decision to relocate to the beachfront is an exciting opportunity to revive the community market in this iconic location.’

Mayor Richardson said that when you balance the constraints of the temporary sites with cancellation of the markets for six months, the move is the best option.

‘Market stalls are businesses providing regular incomes for people and families, many of them locals, and to cancel the markets would have a huge impact on their livelihoods.

‘Change is difficult for people but this is only short-term so I am hoping that local residents and regular market goers will make a conscious decision to continue to support the markets, and the stall holders, as they have done for years.

‘Keep supporting, keep loving our markets and keep the tradition of a great experience alive,’ he said.

The markets will move back to the Butler Street Reserve in February 2020.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

5 COMMENTS

  1. Mr Mayor. Would it be too difficult to change the state of affairs regarding the maintenance and remediation of the current Butler Street Reserve?
    So once the markets return to their Home it would be lovely to see them returned to a nice green clean space that is gravel free.

    How’s this for an idea, the Community Centre and Council get it together to pour some money back into the gravel pit to make it a showpiece.

  2. The Byron Beach Front is a great Environmental Icon in its own right, and has been regenerated for years and years by residents and volunteers.

    Having a monthly market in this fragile location is a truly idiotic idea, only to be matched by the Butler St bypass, yet another travesty foisted on to the Shire by this ‘having an identity-crisis’ Green Council.

  3. An environmental concern is that compression of the grounds be minimised, as this has a huge bearing on water penetration to all tree root systems.
    No-one wants to see these trees die off, in this already fragile landscape.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Man charged following pursuit – Far North Coast

A man has been charged with driving offences following a police pursuit in the state’s far north.

More government support needed for nurses

What would it take to keep our nurses and paramedics from resigning en masse as the current crisis in the NSW health care system worsens?

Aboriginal Tent Embassy 1972–2022 – the power of patience

The Aboriginal Tent Embassy was established on the lawns opposite Old Parliament House on 26 January 1972. Four First Nations men sat beneath a beach umbrella protesting the government’s attitude towards Indigenous land rights.

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: Listening to the truth tellers

A long time ago my husband had to attend a meeting in Redfern. He works in the health and academic sector and it was a consultation with some First Nations clinicians and community workers. He arrived a little earlier for the meeting to the centre – not your typical clinical setting but a regular house. On arrival he was greeted by an older woman who led him to a table and offered him a cup of tea. They chatted. Had a laugh. She offered him a biscuit.