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Byron Shire
December 4, 2022

Coorabell Public School’s Jungle Doof

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Coorabell PS kids having way too much fun at their jungle disco. Victoria Dombroski.

Maia Borrack

Last Friday the students of Coorabell Public School transformed their library into a sparkling jungle, in preparation for their most epic disco yet.

Over 100 students dressed as their favourite animals and were entranced by DJ Shorty Brown, who played a range of tunes from the jungle theme to pop.

Parents, teachers and kids enjoying jungle fun. Photo Victoria Dombroski.

The disco ran on late into the afternoon. Students lead their parents and  teachers with their best dance moves.

Simon from Coorabell Public School P&C says, ‘the disco was simply to bring the students and our community together in a fun environment.’

Coorabell Public School runs meaningful community focussed events every term. They make sure to keep the events as sustainable as possible using reusable plates and cups. Replacing glow sticks with face paint and using plant based decorations.

 

Maia Borrack is on Year 10 Work Experience


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