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Byron Shire
March 6, 2021

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: Coal Dancing

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It’s on, the fight the Murdoch papers have been waiting to see. Adani – ironically defended by the very same people it will end up fucking over! The media have been busy fuelling the antagonism between the two camps known as ‘pro-Adani’ and ‘anti-Adani’. Couldn’t they just be called ‘pro-future of the planet’ and ‘anti-future of the planet’? Or ‘two groups of people who will get equal benefit from an Adani coal mine: none’.

While pro-Adani supporters get backrubs from Pauline and Clive as they paint placards with tired slogans about Greens taking their jobs, perhaps they need to consider that the renewable-energy industry not only offers more long-term jobs than coal, it also ensures that the areas where they live don’t suffer degradation and that we don’t keep contributing to climate change.

It’s a fact. Renewables actually create MORE jobs than coal. So why are there still Australians holding firm in the coal camp? Coal is screwing them, their kids, and the towns where they live. Vested interests vest a lot of interest in stirring the pot.

It’s pretty clear the Murdoch papers hate renewables. In fact in a story by a Fox News reporter they stated that solar would never work in the US because it didn’t have as much sun as Germany!

Most people think of Murdoch as a media mogul. That’s true, but he’s also an oil man, with considerable equity stakes in oil and gas companies. So it’s no surprise that the Murdoch papers are our corporate cheer squads going for coal.

Paul Murray wrote a coal-sucking syndicated column for Murdoch media that called Bob Brown and the people who were dedicating weeks of their life to speak up against corporate giants ‘smug’. We’re talking about little people standing up against the country’s power brokers. I know who’s smug here, and it’s certainly not people brave enough to protest Adani at the literal coalface.

Going into a community brainwashed by the media into believing that giant corporations like Adani have their interests at heart is terrifying. Especially after the decades of adverserial diatribe that puts each group in their corners to play out the whole orchestrated ‘them and us’ charade.

Yep you’ve seen it before: dole-bludging tree loving hippies in one corner, and hard-working Australians being denied jobs in the other. It’s the story that polarises Australians and distracts us from the truth: that a very small percentage of people will profit at the expense of a great many more. And it seems to me that almost the whole country is against Adani.

It always makes me feel sad when I see ordinary people in support of corporations who will eventually screw them over too. There are not 10,000 jobs – there are probably more jobs at Bunnings. In fact Adani was referred to the consumer watchdog for ‘misleading vulnerable jobseekers with inflated claims’. With driverless trucks and automated vehicles, they’d be lucky to have 100 full-time jobs. The Great Barrier Reef supports 64,000 jobs, so why isn’t the Murdoch muscle ramping up to save that valuable natural asset from the devastating impacts of being a coal port?

Just the other day the Courier Mail reported that ‘700 pro-Adani supporters’ had braved the rain in Mackay dwarfing the Green’s convoy! They live there! All they had to do was turn up – with an umbrella! The Greens’ convoy have had to travel thousands of kilometres, and have braved more than rain; they’ve braved, according to the Canberra Times (coincidentally a Fairfax paper) gunshots, abuse, and stones being thrown at cars. And someone assaulting a 61-year-old woman with a horse. Well, Courier Mail, I’d say that’s a little more intense than rain. Clermont is also refusing to sell food or provide services to the convoy. And the convoy are serving what giant self-interest?

Who is getting rich here? Adani or Bob Brown? The environmental defenders aren’t corporate or medial moguls. They’re not profiteering. They’re passionate about the future. They’re heroes. They are mums and dads, grandparents, and young people – people who actually give a shit about the future of everyone’s kids. This isn’t as Paul Murray naively says about ‘people who can feel warm and fuzzy at the other end of the country telling thousands of Queenslanders what they should be allowed to do for work’.

The future belongs to everyone, not just a few Queenslanders, and coal is not the future. To keep using coal now is like using heroin to give up heroin. So if jobs are the issue: give those thousands of Queenslanders a career in renewables.

Next Saturday the anti-Adani convoy hits Canberra – be there if you can. Don’t believe the bullshit of the mainstream media – they have their investment portfolios, not our best interests, at heart.


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15 COMMENTS

  1. The destruction and the inevitable death of the Great Barrier Reef is connected to Adana and the warming of the Coral Sea.
    Adani is defended by Bill Shorten and Scott Morrison both with short-term thinking in that they think that a few million tonnes of black coal drug out of the Galilee Basin and a few trinkets to the Indians now is economically sound and the way to go for the economy while the death of the Great Barrier Reef when we are talking of the economy will kill off the tourist economy worth many billions of dollars. If the Great Barrier reef dies it will not only reduce the tourist dollar in Queensland but it will reduce the tourist dollar all over Australia. Many international tourists come to Australia just to see the Reef. Adani is beyond belief.

  2. You are very insightful, Mandy. Well put! Bob thanked
    the people at the Mullum rally. I thanked him – because
    of his sense of soul. I’ve been following the Convoy &
    events. The anti-future bunch are beyond belief. Do
    they understand how misinformed & dangerous their
    actions are? I think not. The old saying ‘every dog has
    his day’ is on the money – & I don’t bet. Some beings
    just ain’t human enough.

  3. There’s one overriding consideration in my mind. Every Australian will benefit from the royalties generated from the mine and therefore every Australian will be complicit in compromising our global life support system with more carbon dioxide. Shame on us all if we let it happen.

  4. Came accross this Article…

    Look its not complicated !! Climate change is driven by the position of the sun, and by the activity of the sun itself . In other words , climate change is natural, and human activity has absolutely no impact on it .every 120 thousand years temperatures shoot up , and than slowly cool down to an ice age which can last 5 thousand years . Humanity survived a HUNDRED ice ages followed by warming since it evolved from the great apes , so we can safely conclude that we are not at rick as a species…??? Comments from experts ? 2000 years ago in Roman times the Earth temperatures were 1.5 degrees warmer than todays temperatures..and no fossil fuels were polluting the atmosphere 2000 years ago …for almost 50 years there has been Dooms day predictions regarding global warming, including our own government expert professors have any of those predictions actually happened? There is always divided views on most things in life and global warming is no different…you only ever here from science predicting the human race faces extinction regarding global warming… but whats confusing is the fact that anytime global warming is challenged most people are shut down.. ostracized…now this is happening in government…schools …universities..now that is not i would call a democracy…now regarding coal …if you want to attack the resource industries and phase out coal ..which makes up a chunk of our GDP …well that will be a fiscal disaster …billions from the current running budget of 550 Billion or so …that governments have at there disposal each year …and this would include the most vulnerable welfare recipients…fact 70 percent of my taxs go to welfare ..so try and explain this to the many thousands on welfare that once the production of coal ..and exports stop that your welfare …will be cut substantially..than see what response we all get ?…now for record once again not a supporter of the megga mine only on the grounds of the ammounts of H20 to be used..this by far is our most precious resource on earth..

    • Cpruul. I’ve never heard such a ridiculous argument.
      The earth is not flat… it’s getting too hot!!
      More coal, more heat. Extinction rates go up.
      Financial concerns are irrelevant.

      Scientists are our ‘Canary in the Coal Mine’!

  5. Really Cpruul, you are talking thru your hat! Climate change is the result of greenhouse gas emissions according to experts in field of climate science. You are just cooking up a story about the position of the sun being responsible for climate change. Well the sun has been getting cooler in the last 1000 years it has diminished a little. Your beef is with economy the money from coal will be lost you say.
    Well I think we can manage with a little less money, we can forgo some wealth if it saves the planet from scorching heat and catastrophic weather events. However it seems that even sacrificing a few luxuries for a safer planet will not be necessary because wealth will be generated through renewable energy manufacturing. The old adage “Don’t go down the mine Jack there’s plenty of coal up top” can be changed to “Don’t go down the mine Jack there’s plenty of renewables up top”!

    • Really Nitya !! According to the experts in the field of climate science ..?? . well other climate science experts have a very different view on this subject, however you wont hear this very often because this info is suppressed….!! One expert that has a very different view on Global warming, is Mr Freeman tyson ..94 years old …has over 50 years of experience on Global warming he to Questions the scientists on Global warming..??? .now in Australia Global warming..which is now being refered to as climate change for some reason …. in my opinion is absolute over the top with propaganda!! Now can you give me , any irrefutable evidence that Australia is in a Emergency phase…catastrophic phase …regarding global warming?? Apart from the warm and cold climate we have on this continent…for, exp..water lapping at my door steps…or a Category 5 cyclone sitting over the entire continent…now that maybe a Emergency?? One Example please Nitya ? Now you mention we could all manage with a little less if coal is phased out …well Nitya you may well be able to afford the pay cut .?.. but once again YOU try and explain this to the most vulnerable in Australia Nitya like the homeless 117.000 of them …and it wont stop there either this will filter down through all of Australia…you wont hear this from mainstream politicians either …s*&T scared of losing votes …and as far as renewables is concerned which i think would be great to move to …only if its going to replace coals fiscal benefits to the budgets bottom line …but it will not …

  6. It’s a wonderful anger free debate here I just love it..
    This is not a rant, rightly or wrongly just another view….. Opinions are another story

    A guy whom I greatly respect, (Qld farmer on 5000 acres with cows and corn amongst others) ..who has been surviving for the past 50 years and contributing to the food stocks of Australia. A genuine hard working farmer. Please don’t decide without hearing both sides.

    …..When I told my wife I was doing a post on Adani – for or against? I responded – facts based. She said “oh no, here he goes..”

    Whether you agree or disagree with something you have to make that opinion based on facts.

    The proposed Carmichael Coal mine in the Galilee Basin proposed by Indian conglomerate, Adani, has become a lighting rod for the current Federal election.

    By anyone’s scale, the project is a monster. The mine is planned to contain six open-cut pits and five underground mines over 50 kilometres long and up to 300 meters deep. The surface disturbance area alone is estimated to be 27,000 hectares.

    The Project will cost $16 billion to develop, export up to 25 million tonnes of coal per year in its initial phase and extract 2.3 billion tonnes up until 2077.

    The original proposal required a 388 km standard gauge railway line to be constructed to connect to Abbott Point. A later revision is for a 200 km line to connect to existing rail facilities at Moranbah.

    The output of the mine is equivalent to around 13% of Australia’s thermal coal exports and 2.8% of global thermal coal consumption.

    The Project is estimated to deliver 10,000 jobs during construction up to 2024 and 1500 operational ongoing with $22 billion in taxes and royalties.

    If you read the news, it appears there are two camps – one camp, is that if the mine goes ahead the Great Artesian Basin will be drained and the world will end from climate change. The other, is if it doesn’t go ahead central Queensland will die a slow economic death.

    As with most things, the extreme scenarios of both ends of the argument rarely come to fruition.

    The history of the Carmichael Project is a fascinating one. Its audacious scale, its mind blowing cost, its controversy, its litigation and conflict has never been experienced before in Australia’s history.

    The Adani story could fill a book case or more accurately an entire data room at the top tier law firms that they use.

    However, a quick overview:

    In 2010, Adani Mining Pty Ltd bought the coal tenement that is set to become the Carmichael mine from the now defunct Linc Energy. They paid $650 million. I’ve had a bit to do with Linc Energy over the past few years but that’s another post.

    In 2010, the Coordinator-General declared the proposed Carmichael Coal Mine and Rail Project was being assessed as a ‘Significant Project’. There were photos of Premier Anna Bligh and Treasurer Andrew Fraser out in some paddock with their awkward akubras on talking up the project.

    In 2011, Adani signed a 99 year lease for the Abbott Point Coal Terminal at Bowen. They paid the State Government $2 billion for the privilege. Once again Anna Bligh and Andrew Fraser were out in their awkward looking hard hats talking up the deal.

    In 2012, Adani purchased “Moray Downs” a 300,000 acre cattle station owned by the late Graham Acton for $110 million. Adani’s mine site is contained within the bounds of the property and upon it they proposed a 15,000 person town with an international grade airport.

    On 8 May 2014, Queensland’s Coordinator-General gave approval for the project to proceed. 190 conditions were set by the state during both construction and operations phases of the mine with particular attention paid to groundwater and water bores which may be potentially affected.

    On the 29 July 2014, the Federal Government gave approval for the mine to proceed after 36 conditions were stipulated.

    On 5 August 2015, the Federal Government and Adani signed consent orders in the Federal Court to set aside approval of the Carmichael project. The Department had not taken appropriate regard to two endangered species affected by the proposal, the yakka skink and the Ornamental Snake.

    In 2017, Adani entered into an Indigenous Land Use Agreement with native title claimants the Wangan and Jagalingou people. Some minority members of the Wangan and Jagalingou people sort to over turn the ILUA but the application was rejected by the High Court in 2018.

    The Federal Government signed off on Adanis final approvals, including water management plans, prior to the Morrison Government entering caretaker mode in the lead up to the May 2019 election. Given the 9 years Adani have been waiting for approval – the timing wasn’t great.

    But the Project is still waiting on State Government approval on ground water and also habitat impacts to the “black throated finch”.

    Those against Adani point to numerous adverse environmental impacts ranging from climate change, impacts to the Great Barrier Reef, loss of water in the Great Artesian Basin to loss of endangered species.

    Let’s discuss:

    Climate change

    Australia produces around 556 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions each year. It is estimated Adani will produce around 500,000 tonnes per year. This equates to 0.009% of Australia’s emissions.

    While significant, I doubt Adani alone will end the world.

    While if approved Carmichael will be Australia’s largest coal mine it must be put in context of the other mines operating in the market – Blackwater 13MT, Goonyella 11MT, Mount Arthur 15MT, Morwell 20MT, Newlands 12MT, Peak Downs 13MT, Rolleston 14MT.

    The North Antelope Coal mine in the Powder Basin in the US produces 107MT, Black Thunder in Wyoming 102MT, Cerrajong in Columbia 40MT and Hei Dai Gou mine in China produces 31MT.

    The Great Artesian Basin

    The Great Artesian Basin underpins A$12.8 billion of economic activity annually. Almost all of this is from mining and coal seam gas (A$8 billion) and agriculture (A$4.7 billion).

    Despite a net yearly draw down of 286,000 ML per year from water stored within the Great Artesian Basin, the total exploitation of water over the last 120 years has used less than 0.1% of the water stored in the system.

    Adani have been granted a 12,000 ML license per year to take from “overland flow”. This represents around 1% of the water currently used in the Burdekin Basin. This water does not come from the GAB.

    For this license, Adani are required to pay $20.15 million per year (around $1700 per ML).

    Accusations have been made against Adani for being granted an “unlimited license” to take underground water from the GAB. This is not correct. Adani are licensed to take pit water from their open cut mining operations.

    The Department of Natural Resources and Mines advises that Carmichael will take a maximum of 4550 megalitres of groundwater a year.

    According to the Minister:

    “This is roughly equivalent to the amount used each year by a 450 hectares of cane farm land in the Lower Burdekin.”

    While 4550 ML is a lot of water, Adani’s take from the GAB is 0.015% per year.

    Damage to the Great Barrier Reef

    Putting climate change impacts to the side (or Adani’s 0.009% of Australia’s 1.3% of global emissions), the Adani Project has been accused of causing irreversible damage to the GBR mainly through sediment and shipping.

    The Carmichael Mine is 300km from the coast. The mine is located in the Burdekin catchment above the Burdekin Dam. Adani will be required to comply with some of the most stringent water quality requirements than any other coal mine in Australia and far less than other land uses in the catchment, namely grazing and irrigated agriculture.

    Queensland exports, via ships, around 230 million tonnes of coal per year through the Great Barrier Reef. Adani’s extra ships will increase traffic by around 10%.

    The Australian Conservation Foundation took the federal environment minister to court claiming he failed to take account of the climate change impact of the Adani project and potential harm to the reef when he approved it.

    ACFs argument was rejected by a full bench of the Federal Court.

    Species Loss

    The project will impact 5000 hectares of “remnant vegetation”. This has been required to be offset under Queensland’s “offset” regulations.

    Considering 198,000 hectares of remnant vegetation was cleared between 2016-2018 in Queensland, Adani’s approval is 5% of that but over a 60 year period.

    Under the EPBC, additional offsets of up to 10,000 hectares are required for endangered species.

    Adani has set aside 33,000 hectares of land as conservation offsets for endangered species – Triple the statutory requirement.

    Impact to landholders

    The mine only directly affects one property which Adani owns. The biggest impact will be from their railway line – initially 78 from their first alignment and 22 from their reduced option.

    Adani is also required to enter into “make good” water agreements with approximately 10 adjacent landholders whose sub-artesian bores may be effected.

    I can appreciate their concern. However, you have to put it in the perspective of the 500 water bores predicted to be adversely affected by CSG operations in the Surat Basin and the 100s of bore in the Bowen basin impacted by coal mine activities.

    Given that Adani will only extract coal to 300 meters (which is shallow when compared to Bowen basin mines) and the majority of the higher quality of water is beneath the Rewan Formation (a 300 meter thick clay stone) – if affected landholders lose access to water, Adani will be required to drill them deeper water bores.

    Cumulative impacts

    Adani aren’t flying solo in the Galilee basin. And this is what concerns me the most with the approval process.

    There are currently nine coal “mega-mines” proposed for the Galilee Basin, which together make it the second biggest fossil fuel expansion proposed anywhere in the world (after Western China).

    At full production, the proposed Galilee Basin projects would double Australia’s coal exports to over 600 million tonnes a year.

    These mining leases are owned by big hitters such as GVK, Gina Rinehart, Clive Palmer, MacMines (owned by Chinese company Meijin Energy Group) and Vale (one of the largest coal producers in the world).

    Arguably, an Adani approval will “uncork” the untapped potential of the Galilee Basin.

    Perhaps Adani is the whipping boy in the much larger “Game of Thrones of Coal”.

    What about the people?

    Those advocating for Adani talk about jobs, royalties and taxes.
    CO2 is pumped into green houses to make plants grow and is used by plants and trees to make oxygen.
    the planet is actually greener now I would say Carbon MonOxide When I told my wife I was doing a post on Adani – for or against? I responded – facts based.

    Whether you agree or disagree with something you have to make that opinion based on facts.

    The proposed Carmichael Coal mine in the Galilee Basin proposed by Indian conglomerate, Adani, has become a lighting rod for the current Federal election.

    By anyone’s scale, the project is a monster. The mine is planned to contain six open-cut pits and five underground mines over 50 kilometres long and up to 300 meters deep. The surface disturbance area alone is estimated to be 27,000 hectares.

    The Project will cost $16 billion to develop, export up to 25 million tonnes of coal per year in its initial phase and extract 2.3 billion tonnes up until 2077.

    The original proposal required a 388 km standard gauge railway line to be constructed to connect to Abbott Point. A later revision is for a 200 km line to connect to existing rail facilities at Moranbah.

    The output of the mine is equivalent to around 13% of Australia’s thermal coal exports and 2.8% of global thermal coal consumption.

    The Project is estimated to deliver 10,000 jobs during construction up to 2024 and 1500 operational ongoing with $22 billion in taxes and royalties.

    If you read the news, it appears there are two camps – one camp, is that if the mine goes ahead the Great Artesian Basin will be drained and the world will end from climate change. The other, is if it doesn’t go ahead central Queensland will die a slow economic death.

    As with most things, the extreme scenarios of both ends of the argument rarely come to fruition.

    The history of the Carmichael Project is a fascinating one. Its audacious scale, its mind blowing cost, its controversy, its litigation and conflict has never been experienced before in Australia’s history.

    The Adani story could fill a book case or more accurately an entire data room at the top tier law firms that they use.

    However, a quick overview:

    In 2010, Adani Mining Pty Ltd bought the coal tenement that is set to become the Carmichael mine from the now defunct Linc Energy. They paid $650 million. I’ve had a bit to do with Linc Energy over the past few years but that’s another post.

    In 2010, the Coordinator-General declared the proposed Carmichael Coal Mine and Rail Project was being assessed as a ‘Significant Project’. There were photos of Premier Anna Bligh and Treasurer Andrew Fraser out in some paddock with their awkward akubras on talking up the project.

    In 2011, Adani signed a 99 year lease for the Abbott Point Coal Terminal at Bowen. They paid the State Government $2 billion for the privilege. Once again Anna Bligh and Andrew Fraser were out in their awkward looking hard hats talking up the deal.

    In 2012, Adani purchased “Moray Downs” a 300,000 acre cattle station owned by the late Graham Acton for $110 million. Adani’s mine site is contained within the bounds of the property and upon it they proposed a 15,000 person town with an international grade airport.

    On 8 May 2014, Queensland’s Coordinator-General gave approval for the project to proceed. 190 conditions were set by the state during both construction and operations phases of the mine with particular attention paid to groundwater and water bores which may be potentially affected.

    On the 29 July 2014, the Federal Government gave approval for the mine to proceed after 36 conditions were stipulated.

    On 5 August 2015, the Federal Government and Adani signed consent orders in the Federal Court to set aside approval of the Carmichael project. The Department had not taken appropriate regard to two endangered species affected by the proposal, the yakka skink and the Ornamental Snake.

    In 2017, Adani entered into an Indigenous Land Use Agreement with native title claimants the Wangan and Jagalingou people. Some minority members of the Wangan and Jagalingou people sort to over turn the ILUA but the application was rejected by the High Court in 2018.

    The Federal Government signed off on Adanis final approvals, including water management plans, prior to the Morrison Government entering caretaker mode in the lead up to the May 2019 election. Given the 9 years Adani have been waiting for approval – the timing wasn’t great.

    But the Project is still waiting on State Governemnt approval on ground water and also habitat impacts to the “black throated finch”.

    Those against Adani point to numerous adverse environmental impacts ranging from climate change, impacts to the Great Barrier Reef, loss of water in the Great Artesian Basin to loss of endangered species.

    Let’s discuss:

    Climate change

    Australia produces around 556 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions each year. It is estimated Adani will produce around 500,000 tonnes per year. This equates to 0.009% of Australia’s emissions.

    While significant, I doubt Adani alone will end the world.

    While if approved Carmichael will be Australia’s largest coal mine it must be put in context of the other mines operating in the market – Blackwater 13MT, Goonyella 11MT, Mount Arthur 15MT, Morwell 20MT, Newlands 12MT, Peak Downs 13MT, Rolleston 14MT.

    The North Antelope Coal mine in the Powder Basin in the US produces 107MT, Black Thunder in Wyoming 102MT, Cerrajong in Columbia 40MT and Hei Dai Gou mine in China produces 31MT.

    The Great Artesian Basin

    The Great Artesian Basin underpins A$12.8 billion of economic activity annually. Almost all of this is from mining and coal seam gas (A$8 billion) and agriculture (A$4.7 billion).

    Despite a net yearly draw down of 286,000 ML per year from water stored within the Great Artesian Basin, the total exploitation of water over the last 120 years has used less than 0.1% of the water stored in the system.

    Adani have been granted a 12,000 ML license per year to take from “overland flow”. This represents around 1% of the water currently used in the Burdekin Basin. This water does not come from the GAB.

    For this license, Adani are required to pay $20.15 million per year (around $1700 per ML).

    Accusations have been made against Adani for being granted an “unlimited license” to take underground water from the GAB. This is not correct. Adani are licensed to take pit water from their open cut mining operations.

    The Department of Natural Resources and Mines advises that Carmichael will take a maximum of 4550 megalitres of groundwater a year.

    According to the Minister:

    “This is roughly equivalent to the amount used each year by a 450 hectares of cane farm land in the Lower Burdekin.”

    While 4550 ML is a lot of water, Adani’s take from the GAB is 0.015% per year.

    Damage to the Great Barrier Reef

    Putting climate change impacts to the side (or Adani’s 0.009% of Australia’s 1.3% of global emissions), the Adani Project has been accused of causing irreversible damage to the GBR mainly through sediment and shipping.

    The Carmichael Mine is 300km from the coast. The mine is located in the Burdekin catchment above the Burdekin Dam. Adani will be required to comply with some of the most stringent water quality requirements than any other coal mine in Australia and far less than other land uses in the catchment, namely grazing and irrigated agriculture.

    Queensland exports, via ships, around 230 million tonnes of coal per year through the Great Barrier Reef. Adani’s extra ships will increase traffic by around 10%.

    The Australian Conservation Foundation took the federal environment minister to court claiming he failed to take account of the climate change impact of the Adani project and potential harm to the reef when he approved it.

    ACFs argument was rejected by a full bench of the Federal Court.

    Species Loss

    The project will impact 5000 hectares of “remnant vegetation”. This has been required to be offset under Queensland’s “offset” regulations.

    Considering 198,000 hectares of remnant vegetation was cleared between 2016-2018 in Queensland, Adani’s approval is 5% of that but over a 60 year period.

    Under the EPBC, additional offsets of up to 10,000 hectares are required for endangered species.

    Adani has set aside 33,000 hectares of land as conservation offsets for endangered species – Triple the statutory requirement.

    Impact to landholders

    The mine only directly affects one property which Adani owns. The biggest impact will be from their railway line – initially 78 from their first alignment and 22 from their reduced option.

    Adani is also required to enter into “make good” water agreements with approximately 10 adjacent landholders whose sub-artesian bores may be effected.

    I can appreciate their concern. However, you have to put it in the perspective of the 500 water bores predicted to be adversely affected by CSG operations in the Surat Basin and the 100s of bore in the Bowen basin impacted by coal mine activities.

    Given that Adani will only extract coal to 300 meters (which is shallow when compared to Bowen basin mines) and the majority of the higher quality of water is beneath the Rewan Formation (a 300 meter thick clay stone) – if affected landholders lose access to water, Adani will be required to drill them deeper water bores.

    Cumulative impacts

    Adani aren’t flying solo in the Galilee basin. And this is what concerns me the most with the approval process.

    There are currently nine coal “mega-mines” proposed for the Galilee Basin, which together make it the second biggest fossil fuel expansion proposed anywhere in the world (after Western China).

    At full production, the proposed Galilee Basin projects would double Australia’s coal exports to over 600 million tonnes a year.

    These mining leases are owned by big hitters such as GVK, Gina Rinehart, Clive Palmer, MacMines (owned by Chinese company Meijin Energy Group) and Vale (one of the largest coal producers in the world).

    Arguably, an Adani approval will “uncork” the untapped potential of the Galilee Basin.

    Perhaps Adani is the whipping boy in the much larger “Game of Thrones of Coal”.

    What about the people?

    Those advocating for Adani talk about jobs, royalties and taxes.

    Probably the missing segment of the debate is best put by The Australian’s Judith Sloan:

    “Think of the benefits of this world-class project for India, a country where more than 300 million people live without electricity. And consider the more than 100 high-efficiency, low-emissions power stations being built around the world that will consume coal whether or not they use (high-quality, low-ash) Australian coal.”

    Possibly the missing segment of the debate is best put by The Australian’s Judith Sloan:

    Probably the most heinous thing said about Adani comes from Labor Deputy Opposition Leader Ms Tanya Plibersek when she said “we can’t rely on an Indian company to bring jobs to central and western Queensland.” where 60% of Australian exports come from.

    So we can rely on Japanese, Korean, Chinese, American, Swiss,UK and Brazilians to own and control our coal mines but just not Indians who are the greatest number of all migrants to Australia .

  7. A couple of points:
    1. The coal mines in the Galilee Basin supporting very few workers are likely to put other coal miners in Quensland and NSW out of work or force them to fly in, fly out when they currently live in nearby towns.
    2. Cpruul needs to do a bit of serious study before taking to the keyboards.
    3. Bill Shorten and the ALP neither oppose nor support the Adani mine but they will have to make up their mind if they win office, which is likely.
    4. There is a fair bit of evidence that the mine will destroy the spring nearby and the Great Barrier Reef through increased activity in the ocean

    • No kind of Argument …Stephanie ..have always maintained my stance on the Mine …i do not support it , on the grounds , that it will use to much water !! Which IS our most precious resource we have on Planet Earth …not because of emissions..!!

      Australia is not the Problem when it comes to Global Warming … Fact ….Irrefutable…!!

      Now this is confirmed by Australia’s Chief Scientist
      Dr Allan Finkel who TESTIFIED that a complete decarbonisation of the Australian economy would do “Virtually nothing ” to change global warming.

      Or, to put it another way, the cost of doing nothing is, well, nothing …..

      Finkels testimony was NOT challenged by the Greens , labor , or the Coalition. Or the ABC …

      But its a Emergency in Australia Right ?

  8. It seems to me that we dont burn much coal compared to what we export to asia so lets concentrate on that..Sure we might have to lower our expectations on government services but a small price to pay me thinks

  9. Please have a look at the Climate Council report just released:

    I am not a scientist, but I believe that the Paris climate agreement contains a
    clause on exported Carbon pollution, & apparently that would push Australia up to one of the Highest Carbon & pollution emitters in the world. I also seem to have heard that the Galilee coal is of such a poor quality that it would not be allowed to be used in a new Coal fired power station in Australia.

    In my opinion, Australia cannot afford to allow the Galilee basin to be opened. The other real risk is that the inimitable Clivus Palmer apparently owns a bigger land lease right next to Adani. If that unmentionable gets any members into Parliament, they will most probably try to pass Adani so dear Clive can start his own destruction. (Cliveś alleged lease is also possibly inferior quality of the Adani coal)

    Adani has also stated that the mine will be automated, so the jobs in Queensland are smoke & mirrors anyway. Queensland would be better to invest in Sustainable power generation & some real future jobs!

  10. Thanks Malcom – thanks Doug. 9 other mega mines…
    the basin then becomes the 2nd largest in the world.
    Now that’s environmentally logical – a real wedding of
    opposites. Clive & Gina love a sunburnt country & all
    who’ll never benefit from it. Most of the coal will be
    ‘the crappy kind’ so by all means let’s give it to India.
    But why would we do that? We could so easily give
    Adani’s home the latest technology so that the
    people would have affordable power. Too simple.
    There’s no loot in it. Look up the definition for
    ‘looters’.

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