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Byron Shire
May 7, 2021

Students strike 4 climate action to keep pressure on

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School Strike 4 Climate Byron earlier this year. Photo Aslan Shand.

The youth of today aren’t planning to let politicians off the hook – now that the elections are over they are keeping the pressure on with another climate march being organised for Friday May 24 at Butler Street Reserve at 10am.

The past year has witnessed the surge of millions of kids worldwide, unifying to protest the continued political inaction that has jeopardised a safe future for all,’ say organisers.

The School Strike 4 Climate was inspired by 16 year old Swedish student Greta Thunburg and the momentum of this movement has gained international status. The last strike in March saw over 1,000 kids striking regionally in Lismore, Byron Bay and Murwillumbah, over 150,000 kids went on strike nationally and over 1.6 million students went on strike worldwide.

Change needed

‘We can not afford to continue the way we have. It is time for a complete systematic change and redefining of our government’s priorities,’ says year eleven student from Byron Bay High School, Mia Thom who has been one of the key organisers of the Byron Bay climate strike marches.

‘We can not afford to sit idly by and watch our only chance of a safe future jeopardised by short-sighted economically fuelled politicians. The youth of today are rising and this insurgency will not be quelled.’

Byron Shire kids will join this international movement on Friday May 24 to remind the newly elected government that this crisis is still at the forefront of young people’s minds and it is their moral obligation to ensure a safe future, say the strike’s organisers.

‘How to stop and reverse the effects of climate change is our foremost concern and it is up to the politicians elected by the people to protect and preserve a future for not only our nation but the world, who must lead us to do so,’ says Jahla Ferguson a year eleven student from Cape Byron Steiner.

Calling politicians to account

Student strikers from around the world are calling politicians to account because they can see that they are refusing to ‘implement sufficient climate policies, to stem the continued increase in warming temperatures. Australian politicians still refuse to close the Adani Coal Mine despite the fact that burning coal is considered one of the greatest causes of carbon emissions,’ say the striking students in their press release.

Students are meeting at the Butler Street Reserve on May 24 at 10 am, and walking from there to Main Beach. There will be speeches from local students and musical items from young artists.

‘These marches have became a powerful call for action, transcending borders and countries. A call for action that cannot be ignored. Yet politicians still refuse to implement sufficient climate policies, to stem the continued increase in warming temperatures. Australian politicians still refuse to close the Adani Coal Mine despite the fact that burning coal is considered one of the greatest causes of carbon emissions,’ say the student organisers.


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2 COMMENTS

  1. Adani is ‘poison’ to the country – so many
    adults know that. I will not stop supporting
    you & your right to have Climate Change
    dealt with. Stay calm. You can out-speak
    any politician any day.

  2. For a poison it seems to have served well for 200 odd years. You,d obviously prefer to have some poor Indian woman cooking her families meal on dried cowsh.t. I,ll ask this again to see if any rational response is forthcoming. The entirety of Australia contributes 4.2 parts per 10,000 parts of CO2 to the man made burden. What affect is the removal of that going to have on Global Cooling, hang on sorry that was 1970,s, Global Warming, sorry again thats so 2000, Climate Change?. I can guess the response you science denier..

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