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Byron Shire
May 18, 2021

Hole-in-one for Byron golfer

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Margaret was thrilled with her hole-in-one.

Margaret Pierce was thrilled to score her first hole-in-one on the Byron Bay course in September, after 20 years of playing golf.

‘It was quite thrilling actually,’ she said. 

She was playing in the regular Byron Bay Golf Club stableford competition with Lyn Barber, Alison Dreyer and Mary Vincent.

‘It was the eighth hole, the longest par three on the course, roughly 160 metres. I hit a good shot and watched it roll onto the green but didn’t pay any further attention. I just thought, “Oh that’s good, on the green,” she said.

‘When we got to the green there was a ball about a metre onto the green which I thought was mine – but it wasn’t, so we looked everywhere – in the bunker, off to the side and over the back, but I was sure it was not a big enough shot to run off over the back.

‘Eventually Lyn walked past the hole and there it was. There was a lot of excited screaming, 

‘There were congratulations and high-fives all ‘round and I sported a big grin on my face for quite a while. 

‘It was the first hole in one I have scored in 20 years of golf ,so, yes, I was quite chuffed,’ Margaret said.

Margaret is the assistant secretary of Byron Bay Ladies Golf.


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