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Byron Shire
October 6, 2022

Beetles are friends with benefits

Latest News

Floodplain developments major concern for Kingscliff, Tumbulgum and Chinderah communities

Concerned community representatives for Kingscliff, Tumbulgum and Chinderah communities met with Member for Tweed Geoff Provest last Friday to discuss the risks of approved but yet to built developments on flood prone land.

Other News

A journey of a step or two

Apart from organic shiraz, my latest investment in health is this mini-stepper, or ‘massage stepper’ as they call it in the country of origin.

Celebration as Farrelly House reopens in Lismore

On Tuesday to the relief and joy of dozens of Lismore folk, Farrelly House, the home of Red Inc. and the Rural Financial Counselling Service (RFCS), reopened on Magallan Street.

Police pursuit after ute and motorbike stolen

NSW Police were at Pat Smith Park in Dulguigan, after reports a motorcycle had been stolen. As they arrived two males fled the scene, one on a motorcycle and the other in an Isuzu utility. The utility failed to stop for police and a pursuit was initiated.

Lismore at the HART of helping transport needs

It is challenging enough when you need to get around to medical appointments let alone if you don’t have access to transport. 

Alstonville takes out top tier of the Oceania Cup

The Oceania Cup delivered exciting and close football for the 19 teams that competed across last weekend at the...

Byron Shire floodplain risks to be highlighted to NSW premier

Byron Shire Council have recognised 1,454 flood-affected homes in Byron Shire that could benefit from the government’s much touted assistance via its Northern Rivers Reconstruction Corporation.

The feeding and breeding activities of dung beetles help to control problems
caused by large accumulations of dung. Photo supplied.

Who knew that the humble dung beetle was important to our waste disposal?

The extended drought and hot spring conditions of the past year have affected dung beetle activity in the Kyogle area and the difference is not invisible.

Supported by the national Dung Beetle Ecosystems Engineers program, The Border Ranges – Richmond Valley Landcare Network (BRRVLN) has been monitoring dung beetle activity on properties in the Upper Richmond River catchment since April 2019.

Previous surveys in Upper Richmond River catchment have shown that introduced dung beetles are most productive in the months January to March. Activity outside of these months is dependent on soil temperature and moisture.

Twenty-seven species on the north coast

A long-term annual survey involving Wollongbar TAFE students has identified 27 introduced and native species active on the NSW north coast. At least ten summer active species can be found in the Kyogle area.

To date no winter or early spring active species have been successfully established, unlike parts of southern Australia where large, winter active species are becoming more commonplace on pastures.

Gavin Tinning from Border Ranges Richmond Valley Landcare Network (BRRVLN) said dung beetles serve several essential ecological functions. ‘Digging aerates the soil and transfers nutrients back into the ground by releasing the nutrients in the dung. Breaking down manure also controls buffalo and bush flies from breeding’.

Gavin said most active species encountered this year have been smaller species. ‘This may show that they are more resilient to extremes in climatic conditions.’

A dung beetle nursery

BRRVLN has established a dung beetle nursery to assess the viability of a spring-active species, recently introduced in Australia to fill a gap in dung beetle activity. However, unusually hot, dry conditions in 2019 may have influenced the experiment. BRRVLN hopes to repeat this on-farm research this Spring.

This project is supported by North Coast Local Land Services through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program aimed at improving soil health.

Want to know more about your local dung beetles? If you are interested in finding out what species of dung beetle you have on your farm, you can download the MyDungBeetleReporter app, or go to https://www.dungbeetles.com.au/dung-beetles/what-species-are-near-you.


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How to weave yarns and community this weekend

Beginner and advanced basket weavers have a chance to develop their skills under master tutelage this weekend in Ballina with thanks to the Northern Rivers Community Gallery.

Celebration as Farrelly House reopens in Lismore

On Tuesday to the relief and joy of dozens of Lismore folk, Farrelly House, the home of Red Inc. and the Rural Financial Counselling Service (RFCS), reopened on Magallan Street.

A journey of a step or two

Apart from organic shiraz, my latest investment in health is this mini-stepper, or ‘massage stepper’ as they call it in the country of origin.

Tweed Council leads the way for responsible dog ownership

The reality is that if you let your dog off-leash in areas where there is native wildlife from birds to wallabies they will disturb nesting sites and potentially attack, maim and kill wildlife, regardless of how much you love them.