16.1 C
Byron Shire
December 2, 2022

Telestroke Service in Lismore for regional patients

Latest News

A gentle day for refugee and asylum seeker families

Promoting community awareness, assistance and support, for asylum seekers and refugees, the Pottsville Refugee Support Group recently hosted refugee and asylum seeker families from Logan at a fun day at the beach.

Other News

Warning: Northern Rivers Rail Trail not ready yet

Love or hate it, the Northern Rivers Rail Trail is under construction and the community is being urged to wait until it is safe for public use.

Climate change a threat to local Gondwana rainforest mountain frogs

A new Southern Cross University study predicts that two species of mountain frogs located on the NSW/Queensland border are on track to be extinct by 2055.

Nimbin boil water alert lifted – remains for rural water supply

The Boil Water Alert for the village of Nimbin has been lifted, effective immediately – but remains in place for rural users. 

Greens for energy

V. Cosford Remember how huge wheatgrass juice was – ten to fifteen years ago? Walk past a local cafe and...

Planning for Casino and Urban Growth

Richmond Valley Council is seeking community feedback on two key strategic documents - the draft Richmond Valley Growth Management Strategy and Casino Place Plan.

Sunday choral celebration to raise funds for new Syrian refugee families

Two Syrian refugee families have been welcomed on the Northern Rivers in recet months as part of a national resettlement pilot program featuring just ten families.

With border closures narrowing our access to a range of health services, it’s good news when a new service comes into the area.

From today, stroke patients in the Northern Rivers will have access to an innovative new telehealth service as part of a $21.7 million initiative being rolled out across NSW.

The NSW Telestroke Service will go live at Lismore Base Hospital this morning, linking stroke patients with specialist stroke clinicians via telehealth.

The service enables time-critical diagnosis and treatment for patients in regional and rural areas.

Director Clinical Operations, Northern NSW Local Health District Lynne Weir, said people in regional and rural areas have a far greater risk of hospitalisation from stroke and this vital service will provide them with immediate, life-saving diagnosis and treatment from the state’s leading clinicians.

Improving outcomes for stroke patients

‘The Telestroke Service will improve outcomes for stroke patients in our region, giving them a much greater chance of surviving and leading a normal life.’

The service links expert stroke clinicians with local emergency physicians to quickly determine the best possible treatment plan for a patient.

Every year, around 19,000 residents in NSW have a stroke. At Lismore Base Hospital from January to December 2019 there were 253 stroke patients admitted to hospital.

Lismore Base Hospital Stroke Coordinator Kim Hoffman, said a stroke is a medical emergency, and kills up to 1.9 million brain cells per minute. ‘This Telestroke Service will have an enormous impact by providing time-critical, best-practice treatment that saves lives and reduces lifelong disability.

‘It’s also really important that people learn to recognise stroke symptoms and call an ambulance immediately, to give stroke sufferers the best chance of a successful outcome,’ said Ms Hoffman.

‘The F.A.S.T. test is an easy way to spot the signs of stroke, which I encourage everyone to learn.’

F.A.S.T. stands for:

– Face: Check the person’s face. Has their mouth drooped?

– Arms: Can the person lift both arms?

– Speech: Is the person’s speech slurred? Do they understand you?

– Time: Is critical. If you see any of these signs call 000 straight away.

Developed by eHealth NSW and the Agency for Clinical Innovation, the NSW Telestroke Service is based at Sydney’s Prince of Wales Hospital. The service will expand to up to 23 sites over the next three years, with Grafton Base Hospital and The Tweed Hospital expected to roll out in the program in 2021.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Brunswick, Belongil and Tallows wait for Emergency Response Beacons

In early November two men were saved from drowning at Dreamtime Beach, Fingal Head when a women activated the Emergency Response Beacon, alerting the Surf Life Saving NSW State Operations Centre that the men were drowning. There are three waiting to be deployed in Byron Shire.

Dogs – stay out 

Byron’s Main Beach and playground is a no-dog area. About ten signs clearly state this and unless someone is indifferent, or dumb, or a...

Editorial – Wokie dokey

Last Thursday’s Council meeting was an example of when a good idea gets kiboshed because the people proposing the idea are considered crazy conspiracy theorists.

Warning: Northern Rivers Rail Trail not ready yet

Love or hate it, the Northern Rivers Rail Trail is under construction and the community is being urged to wait until it is safe for public use.