18.2 C
Byron Shire
April 22, 2024

Blue-green algae alerts at Uki and Bray Park Weir

Latest News

Mullumbimby railway station burns down

At around midnight last night, a fire started which engulfed the old Mullumbimby railway station. It's been twenty years since the last train came through, but the building has been an important community hub, providing office space for a number of organisations, including COREM, Mullum Music Festival and Social Futures.

Other News

Press release vs Save Wallum views

The Echo editor (page 1, 10 April) might need to consider the role of a journalist – particularly that...

Anti-Israel bias

Many locals have approached me to say how shocked they are at the extreme anti-Israel bias that is expressed...

Wallum

It is, at best, amusing, but mostly disappointing, to see The Echo reporting on the mayoral minute to Council...

New chef at Crystalbrook Byron

Joachim Borenius has been appointed as the new executive chef at Crystalbrook Byron resort’s signature restaurant, Forest. Joachim Borenius brings...

Ballina Greens announce ticket for 2024

Aiming to build on their two existing councillors, the Ballina Greens have announced their team of candidates for the upcoming Ballina Shire Council elections, set for 14 September this year.

Local grom takes national tube-riding prize

Local grom takes national tube-riding prize. Broken Head surfer Leihani Zoric has taken out first place in the U/14 girls and best barrel (girl) categories of the Australian Junior Online Surf Championships.

A blue-green algae amber alert has been issued for Bray Park Weir and the Tweed River at Uki.

Tweed Council is wanting to reassure residents that treated water from the Tweed mains supply remains safe to drink despite alerts for blue-green algae being extended in the Shire.

Today, amber alerts for blue-green algae were issued for the Tweed River at Uki and Bray Park Weir. Last week an amber alert was issued for Clarrie Hall Dam.

Council testing has shown the level of blue-green algae has quadrupled at the dam in the past week, most likely due to the high level of nutrients washed into the dam by the December rains and continuing hot weather. Despite this, potentially toxic species of blue-green algae currently are not dominant.

Weir is full

The dam is full and spilling to Doon Doon Creek, a tributary of the Tweed River, allowing algae to flow downstream to Uki and Bray Park Weir.

Council draws raw water at Uki to treat at the village’s water treatment plant and again at Bray Park Weir to treat for the bulk of the Shire’s water customers.

Council’s water treatment processes are designed to remove any potential toxin from blue-green algae. Treatment also removes any taste and odour compounds from the algae.

Council will increase testing to monitor the algal blooms, and adjust its treatment processes as required to ensure the Tweed’s drinking water remains safe to drink and pleasant tasting.

Amber alerts mean recreational users of the dam and river should not come into contact with the water and livestock should not drink the water as it could potentially be toxic.

Signs have been placed at popular recreational access points to warn the public of the risks.

Blue-green algae occur naturally and can reproduce quickly in favourable conditions.

Affected water appears to have a green paint-like scum, near the edges, or greenish clumps throughout the water.

Anyone who thinks they may have been in contact with blue-green algal water is advised to seek medical advice if symptoms appear.

For the latest, visit Council’s website at www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/waterandwastewater.


Support The Echo

Keeping the community together and the community voice loud and clear is what The Echo is about. More than ever we need your help to keep this voice alive and thriving in the community.

Like all businesses we are struggling to keep food on the table of all our local and hard working journalists, artists, sales, delivery and drudges who keep the news coming out to you both in the newspaper and online. If you can spare a few dollars a week – or maybe more – we would appreciate all the support you are able to give to keep the voice of independent, local journalism alive.

1 COMMENT

  1. As far as I am aware blue-green algae commonly occurs in this area during dry periods when nutrients build up in the low water levels. The fact that the dam is full and blue-green algae is present rings alarm bells for me, since I would consider that excess nutrients are running into the dam, ie pollutants in the form of nutrients.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Flood insurance inquiry’s North Coast hearings 

A public hearing into insurers’ responses to the 2022 flood was held in Lismore last Thursday, with one local insurance brokerage business owner describing the compact that exists between insurers and society as ‘broken’. 

Getting ready for the 24/25 bush fire season

With this year’s official NSW Bush Fire Danger Period closing on March 21, our thoughts are now turned toward to 2024-25 season and Essential Energy has begun surveying its powerlines in and around the North Coast region.

Keeping watch on Tyalgum Road

Residents keen to stay up to date on the status of the temporary track at Tyalgum Road – particularly during significant rain events – are urged to sign up to a new SMS alert system launched by Tweed Shire Council.

Blaming Queensland again

I was astounded to read Mandy Nolan’s article ‘Why The Nude Beach Is A Wicked Problem’, in which she implied that it may largely...