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Byron Shire
June 19, 2021

Gold, gold, gold – is there a mining future for Tweed?

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A gold mine in the Republic of Guinea. Image: mining technology.com

The application for a mining exploration licence that covers a large swathe of the Tweed Shire continues to raise concerns for Tweed Shire Councillors and residents.

The application, that was lodged in early October 2020, covers 118 square kilometre corridor from Bilambil Heights in the north to Dunbible in the south. It relates to the exploration of metallic minerals including gold, silver and copper.

At the previous Tweed Shire Council meeting (4 February) Councillors noted that the Minister for Regional NSW had responded to their letter in mid-October that objected ‘in the strongest terms to the Exploration (Minerals) Licence Application ELA 6115 in the Tweed Shire’.

While there is no exploration on private land without the written consent of the landholder and no exploration in National Parks or nature reserves Mayor Chris Cherry (Independent) said mining consent on council land needed clarification.

Mayor Cherry told the meeting that she had ‘heard very strongly that people don’t want the mining to happen’.

The majority of councillors, with Cr Pryce Allsop (Conservative) against, voted to write back to the minister ‘to reiterate our deep concerns with regards to gold exploration/mining in the Tweed Shire due to the international significance of the environment and scenic landscape of this Shire, and…’ that the Council does ‘Not support gold exploration or mining activities on Council owned land and any requests for such, including for owners consent to lodge an application, or request for access must be brought to a Council meeting for determination.’

Courts can rule for mining

Councillor Katie Milne (Greens) clarified that while access arrangements are required for the mining exploration to take place on private land a landholder cannot always refuse consent.

‘It is shocking for a lot of people to find out that while they get compensated they don’t have the right to say no. If the negotiation between the landholder and mining company is not successful then it can be taken to court for approval,’ said Cr Milne.

Minyon Falls. filed photo

‘It could be a very big and concerning issue for what is actually an internationally environmentally significant area. The Gondwana rainforest (UNESCO world heritage) is the best example (of the most extensive area of subtropical rainforest) in the world. I think sometimes the state government does not remember that we are an internationally significant environment. We have a very big duty to protect this area. Any mining – including water, sand, and gas – all has a very large impact on our landscape.

‘The land area covered (by the mining exploration licence) is absolutely vast – if it gets approved we may be in the shock of our lives.’


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5 COMMENTS

  1. Greed for money causes tunnel vision for the ones in power to see or think about damage,often irreversible, to environment and future generations. Multi millions seem more important than what the devastation they allow to our more than fragile environment not just the Tweed valley, but globally,not to mention global warming the powers that be have been warned about for DECADES!!!

  2. Modern gold mining works ores at less than 1 gram per tonne of crushed rock. Less than on part in a million.
    Which means very big holes in the Earth, lots of fine crushed rock, lots of cyanide in transport, lots of water polluted, and huge slag heaps left behind. Mountains of dust , toxic with heavy metals, forever available to pollute the water ways and blow in the winds of future generations .
    Where is the demand for new gold coming from?
    Indian women wanting to wear and secure their wealth with gold jewellery.
    O dear.

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