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July 6, 2022

Drone education coming to schools

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Drones are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and there’s always more to learn. Photo supplied.

With drone technology firmly relocated from the hobbyist fringe to the mainstream, students across Australia will get a chance to build their skills as next-generation pilots thanks to an innovative safety campaign being launched by aviation safety regulator CASA in schools.

CASA says children represent a growing proportion of the record numbers of Australians buying and flying drones for fun and recreation. The safety organisation has partnered with youth education specialists to develop a range of materials promoting safety and aligned to the Australian curriculum.

These new resources are designed to help young aviators develop a safe flying culture as they hone their skills in one of the Australia’s fastest-growing technologies.

‘We’re asking children to test their drone safety knowledge through quizzes, school-based learning activities and teacher-led discussions,’ said CASA’s Acting Branch Manager of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Services, Sharon Marshall-Keeffe.

Drone safety is important for pilots of all ages. Photo supplied.

‘In consultation with Education Services Australia, we have designed tailored resources to build awareness, understanding and acceptance of drone safety rules and regulations among young people aged 10 to 16, teachers, parents and carers.

‘We’ve also developed a dedicated education resources section on the campaign website – which is at knowyourdrone.gov.au/classroom – and we strongly recommend the use of CASA-verified safety apps to find out where it’s safe to fly,’ said Ms Marshall-Keeffe.

‘It’s also important to raise awareness of the incoming operator accreditation and registration requirements affecting people over 16 and the need for those under 16 to be supervised by an accredited adult unless flying at a CASA approved flying site,’ she said.

Rules keep everyone safe

Education Services Australia says it’s proud to be playing a role in providing school children with access to information about rules, regulations and flying zones.

‘It’s imperative that children understand the rules and regulations in place to keep themselves and others safe while enjoying the freedom that comes with flying drones,’ said Education Services Australia CEO Andrew Smith.

‘We hope that by arming our pilots of tomorrow with the information they need today, they will take to the skies with confidence, in a safe and responsible manner.’

For more information about what you can and can’t do with a drone, visit the CASA campaign website: knowyourdrone.gov.au.


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