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Byron Shire
December 10, 2022

Police youth assault case back to court

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Following an investigation by the Law Enforcement Conduct Commission (LECC), which provides independent oversight of the NSW Police Force, a charge of common assault was laid against Senior Constable Michael Greenhalgh.

Magistrate Michael Dakin found in favour of Greenhalgh and the charges were dropped in February 2021.

However, the case was appealed to the NSW Supreme Court in July 2022 where NSW Supreme Court, Justice Mark Lerace, upheld the appeal and found there was a key error of law according to the ABC report by Mayeta Clark and Mario Christodoulou.

The case has now been sent back to Magistrate Dakin in Lismore court to be redetermined, and is scheduled for a judge-alone summary hearing in February 2023.

The NSW Police confirmed that the officer involved is no longer employed by the NSW Police Force.


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4 COMMENTS

  1. Whichever way one chooses to look at this situation, it’s very difficult to form a view other than the police officer involved indulged in gratuitous violence towards a distressed young person. How the NSW justice system has found this person not guilty is baffling. A young person naked, crying out in distress and clearly in a psychotic state should have been afforded compassion and care. How could an attending officer get it so wrong?

      • It’s easy to “get it so wrong” amid moments of extreme stress and confusion.
        Try being a police officer for just a week, or be in any active public service function or attend a traffic accident – then both of you might start to understand that your actions in this environment are often the best you can do at the time, but will be severely judged later in far calmer and objective conditions.
        Anyway, the bloke was also so traumatised – he threw in his job.
        My information is that he has swapped careers for something less stressful.

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