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June 13, 2024

Freedom of Entry to Lismore

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Lismore Freedom of Entry parade. Photo supplied.

In accordance with military law and tradition, cities can grant the right to Freedom of Entry to military units, authorising them to freely march through the streets to mark ceremonial occasions with swords drawn, drums beating, bands playing and ensign flying.

Soldiers from the Lismore-based 41st Battalion, Royal New South Wales Regiment, will conduct a Freedom of Entry Parade into the Lismore CBD on Saturday, 22 June.

The honour of the Freedom of Entry became popular during the nineteenth century and draws inspiration from medieval history. A Freedom of Entry is the highest honour a city may bestow on the Australian Defence Force and is celebrated with a ceremonial parade through the city streets.

200 soldiers from the Northern Rivers region

The ceremonial parade will see up to 200 soldiers from the Northern Rivers region, with support by a military marching band, enter the heart of Lismore in full regalia, where they will be halted and formally challenged by Richmond PD District commander, Superintendent Scott Tanner and the Mayor of Lismore, Councillor Steve Krieg.

Commanding Officer of the 41st Battalion, Lieutenant Colonel Danial Healy will lead the parade. It will begin on Magellan Street before marching through to the memorial cenotaph in front of the Lismore Baths on Molesworth Street.

Formally challenging their right of entry

Along the route, the soldiers will be halted as the Local Police Commander and Mayor formally challenge their right of entry into the city, before continuing along the route to Memorial Gardens where the parade will conclude.

The parade is scheduled to begin at 1pm and expected to conclude around 2pm.

Lieutenant Colonel Healy said exercising the battalion’s Freedom of the Entry was an important symbol of the close links between the soldiers and the local community.

‘Soldiers from the 41st Battalion were heavily involved in the first response to the 2022 floods, with many of our members living and working in the local community,’ said Lieutenant Colonel Healy.

‘This parade is an opportunity for Army to deepen our close ties with the City of Lismore and our soldiers are really looking forward to showcasing our Unit, as a prelude to the lantern parade.’

The 41st Battalion’s Headquarters is located on Military Road, in East Lismore (adjacent to Southern Cross University).

 


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