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May 18, 2021

Vegan a healthy choice

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Rather than choosing sides in the feud between A Current Affair and ‘Paleo’ Pete Evans, the Channel Seven chef who promotes a prehistoric diet, let’s focus on the future and how we should all evolve and eat healthy vegan foods.

Although the Paleo Diet has some sensible components—it calls for lots of vegetables, forbids dairy products, and limits sugar and processed foods—it also includes a lot of cholesterol-laden meat, fish, and eggs.

It’s not a healthy choice for people who want sexy abs and strong hearts. In fact, if you eat too many animal-based foods, you’re bound to wind up with a body like Fred Flintstone.

Of course, you likely wouldn’t find a bowl of beef stew in Palaeolithic times. People who lived during the Palaeolithic Era probably ate rodents and wild animals, not cows, pigs, chickens, and other animals who were raised in factory farms and killed in slaughterhouses.

Even the crops that were available during the Stone Age were a lot different than the crops that are available today.

Our current meat production practices are hurting animals, the environment, and our health.

Studies show that meat-eaters are prone to be obese and suffer from heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

Vegan meals, on the other hand, are loaded with heart-healthy fibre and contain no artery-clogging animal fat and cholesterol, so they’re a great choice for anyone looking to slim down.

And it’s much easier and more beneficial to go vegan than to follow a prehistoric diet plan. Go to PETA.org.au for more information and to order your free vegan starter kit.

Desmond Bellamy, PETA (People for Ethical Treatment of Animals)

 


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Quarry comes up against the farmers of Bentley

You would need to be a pretty tough customer to come up against the Bentley farmers, yet, that is exactly what Rob and Sarah McKenzie, the operators of the Bentley Quarry, what they say is a local, family-operated business, are doing.

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How does one react to news of environmental vandalism, rampant domestic violence and mutilation of women without anger or distress?

Business calls for Tweed train tracks to be kept ignored

More than 800 people had signed a petition calling for a new rail trail to be built next to, rather than in place of, the existing disused railway line running through the shire.

Resilient communities training on offer

‘Resilience’ has become a buzzword in Australia over the past few years, as communities across the country struggle to cope with fire, floods, and a pandemic.