Menu

Mt Warning Hotel rises from the ashes

Mt Warning Hotel licensee Geoff Brown, right, and cellarman, Chris Roodes, toast the re-built pub at Uki which will be officially opened tomorrow (Saturday). Photo Jeff Dawson

Mt Warning Hotel licensee Geoff Brown, right, and cellarman, Chris Roodes, toast the re-built pub at Uki which will be officially opened tomorrow (Saturday). Photo Jeff Dawson

More than two years after it burnt to the ground, the historic Mount Warning Hotel, affectionately known as the Uki Pub, will open its doors for a grand official opening tomorrow (Saturday).

The new pub, which replaced the old two-storey timber building gutted by fire in February 2013, will once more serve as the social hub of the village after a long absence.

The hotel opened its doors two weeks ago in a soft trial opening, with hundreds of locals and visitors alike calling in to check it out.

The old hotel was one of the Tweed Valley’s longest standing pubs and a tourist attraction for the area.

The restoration of the hotel took the best part of two years and cost around $2 million, and owner Brett Watson is no doubt proud of the new facility.

Locals as well have welcomed the new-look hotel and taken to a Facebook site, Friends of the Mount Warning Hotel, to express their opinion and to keep informed on how the rebuilding was coming along.

The new-look Mount Warning Hotel.

The new-look Mount Warning Hotel.

 


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

Become a supporter of The Echo

A note from the editorial team

Some of The Echo’s editorial team: journalists Paul Bibby and Aslan Shand, editor Hans Lovejoy, photographer Jeff Dawson and Mandy Nolan

The Echo has never underestimated the intelligence and passion of its readers. In a world of corporate banality and predictability, The Echo has worked hard for more than 30 years to help keep Byron and the north coast unique with quality local journalism and creative ideas. We think this area needs more voices, reasoned analysis and ideas than just those provided by News Corp, lifestyle mags, Facebook groups and corporate newsletters.

The Echo is one hundred per cent locally owned and one hundred per cent independent. As you have probably gathered from what is happening in the media industry, it is not cheap to produce a weekly newspaper and a daily online news service of any quality.

We have always relied entirely on advertising to fund our operations, but often loyal readers who value our local, independent journalism have asked how they could help ensure our survival.

Any support you can provide to The Echo will make an enormous difference. You can make a one-off contribution or a monthly one. With your help, we can continue to support a better informed local community and a healthier democracy for another 30 years.”

Echonetdaily is made possible by the support of all of our advertisers.