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January 26, 2022

Standing ovation at film festival’s opening night

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Byron Bay Film Festival director J’aimee Skippon-Volke with Zach Doomadgee (left) and brother Bailey (right). Photo supplied
Byron Bay Film Festival director J’aimee Skippon-Volke with Zach Doomadgee (left) and brother Bailey (right). Photo supplied

A capacity crowd filled every corner of the Byron Theatre on Friday for the opening night film Zach’s Ceremony, and the gala party that followed.

Filmmakers, sound designers, post-production gurus and film lovers rubbed shoulders with screen and stage identities Lincoln Lewis and Bernard Fanning, and film veterans such as Jack Thompson, a long-time supporter of the festival.

The charming and challenging documentary about an Aboriginal boy’s evolution into manhood through ancient initiation rituals had the packed house on its feet at the end – and even before the film, when Zach Doomadgee and his young brother Bailey performed a traditional dance.

‘Zach’s Ceremony was an absolute hit with the opening night audience,’ said Festival Director J’aimee Skippon-Volke. ‘It’s a work that means so much to so many people.’

Zach, now a charismatic young man, spoke about the journey the documentary had taken him on, and paid tribute to his little brother, who had been anxious about performing for the first time without dad Alec Doomadgee alongside them.

Alec, now a Byron Shire resident and the driving force behind the film, is in New York at the Margaret Mead Film Festival for a screening of Zach’s Ceremony.

Zach’s grandmother also features in the film and her appearance on stage at the Community Centre added to the rapturous reception.

Hip-hop artist Patrick Mau, who had travelled from his home on Thursday Island for the event, opened proceedings with a performance of music from the film.

Zach’s Ceremony is screening again on Sunday, October 23, at 2pm at the Byron Community Centre.

Between now and then thousands of people will be enjoying the remaining 100 plus films, and special events at the festival – the biggest yet in its 10-year history.

Special events include a ride on the Magic Bus from Byron Bay to Brunswick Heads Picture House and back to see Going Furthur, a celebration of the first West Coast hippies aboard the psychedelic bus Furthur, with the film’s creator, Lindsay Kent also on board.

Monday morning you can join the filmmakers and actors at Beach restaurant, Clarke’s Beach, when they will be interviewed by Joanne Shoebridge for an ABC Outdoor Broadcast.

Music lovers are invited to the free screening of 20 of the year’s best music videos at Byron Bay Brewery on Friday, October 21 at 9.30pm.

For programme details and to buy tickets or a Flexi-Pass, visit bbff.com.au. Downloading Byron Bay Film Festival app lets you book your flexi-pass sessions, mark your calendar or purchase tickets.

You can also buy in person from BBFF’s venues.


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1 COMMENT

  1. “A charming and challenging documentary about an Aboriginal boy’s evolution into manhood.”
    Yes, in Australia folks.
    When the Pauline Hanson political group is beginning to morph up to about 10 percent.
    It could only happen in Australia where dark-skinned refugees are not allowed to come by boat.
    They have to go to Manus or Nauru.
    Have another glass of brew.

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Storylines – Aboriginal Tent Embassy 1972–2022 – the power of patience

The Aboriginal Tent Embassy was established on the lawns opposite Old Parliament House on 26 January 1972. Four First Nations men sat beneath a beach umbrella protesting the government’s attitude towards Indigenous land rights.

Mandy Nolan’s Soapbox: Listening to the truth tellers

A long time ago my husband had to attend a meeting in Redfern. He works in the health and academic sector and it was a consultation with some First Nations clinicians and community workers. He arrived a little earlier for the meeting to the centre – not your typical clinical setting but a regular house. On arrival he was greeted by an older woman who led him to a table and offered him a cup of tea. They chatted. Had a laugh. She offered him a biscuit.